Special Issue "Dedication to Professor Michael Tribelsky: 50 Years in Physics"

A special issue of Physics (ISSN 2624-8174). This special issue belongs to the section "Statistical Physics and Nonlinear Phenomena".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Andrey Miroshnichenko
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Guest Editor
School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of New South Wales Canberra, Northcott Drive, Campbell, ACT 2600, Australia
Interests: nanophotoncis; nonlinear optics; optoelectronics; light-matter interaction; fano resonances
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Prof. Dr. Boris Malomed
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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Electronics, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel
Interests: nonlinear optics; Bose–Einstein condensates; solitons; nonlinear waves; pattern formation in dissipative media; nonlinear lattice dynamics
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Prof. Dr. Fernando Moreno
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Guest Editor
Group of Optics, Department of Applied Physics, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander, Spain
Interests: optics; nano-optics; light scattering; biophotonics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

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Michael Tribelsky graduated from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, USSR in 1973, defended his Ph.D. thesis at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technologies in 1976, and got the Second Doctorate (habilitation, known as “Doctor of Physical-Mathematical Sciences”) from the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics in 1983. In 1979, at the age of 28, for his outstanding achievements in the study of optical damage of glass he received the highest USSR national prize for junior scientists: Lenin Komsomol Prize in Science and Technologies.

His first scientific paper (where he was a single author) was published in 1971 when he still was a student. The paper is devoted to the Gunn effect in semiconductors. It is worth mentioning that in this paper he developed an original approximate method to solve the Schrödinger equation in the vicinity of the ground state in a complicated potential (the limit opposite to the WKB). Since that Prof. Tribelsky has made numerous fundamental contributions to an extremely broad area of physics and mathematics, including (but not limited to) quantum solid-state physics, various problems of light-matter interaction, liquid crystals, physical hydrodynamics, nonlinear waves, pattern formation in nonequilibrium systems and transition to chaos, bifurcation and probability theory, and even prediction of the dynamics of actual market prices. In particular, he has published the fundamental papers, which include the following results:

  • The pioneering detailed study of the structure and stability of domain walls between various nonequilibrium (dissipative) structures, such as grains of roll with different orientations in Rayleigh–Bénard–Marangoni convection.
  • The prediction of a new type of stable dissipative structures with quasicrystal symmetry and determination of the criteria for their stability.
  • The discovery of the drift bifurcation transforming a steady dissipative pattern into a traveling wave.
  • The formulation of an approach for determining the height of the barrier separating various locally stable solutions of the Ginzburg–Landau equation in the corresponding functional space and calculating this barrier in the explicit form. This made it possible to determine the "stability margin" of the corresponding solutions for finite-amplitude perturbations.
  • A simple topological explanation of the nature of the violation of weak conservation laws, which led to a "slip" of the phase of the complex order parameter, when its modulus vanishes. The prediction of the universality of the dynamics of the order parameter in the vicinity of the phase-slip-points.
  • In collaboration with I.М. Lifshitz, the formulation and solution of the problem of the propagation of nonlinear elastic waves in metals near the point of the electron-topological phase transition, required the derivation of the nonlinear quantum elasticity theory equations.
  • The prediction of a new and very unusual type of transition to turbulence analogous to the second-order phase transitions, when the turbulent state smoothly detaches directly from the rest state of a fluid (observed experimentally in the electroconvection of liquid crystals).

In the course of his work on light-matter interactions, Prof. Tribelsky’s contribution to the optical breakdown of glass acquired special importance as well as his explanation of the deep laser melting of metals made shortly after the experimental discovery of the effect. Another noteworthy direction of his study is represented by the work on the optical-thermodynamic phenomena in liquids, where a light beam is used as a tool to transfer liquid to a given point of the phase diagram. Finally, it is relevant to mention the pioneering research of Prof. Tribelsky on the dynamics of thermochemical instability in polymers. In his recent work, he has focused on fundamentals of the resonant light scattering by subwavelength particles and made a significant contribution to the understanding of physics of the Fano resonances, anomalous scattering, and absorption, as well as excitation of longitudinal modes in the subwavelength particles made of materials with spatial dispersion. Last but not least should be mentioned his most recent results devoted to the dynamic resonant scattering, opening a door to a new subfield in subwavelength optics.

We would like to stress that all his important (and often counterintuitive) theoretical predictions have found solid experimental evidence. Most of these results remain highly relevant to the current research in this vast area.

Professor Tribelsky's accomplishments are highly appreciated by the international community. The best indications of that are the high citation rates of his publications and numerous awards and titles he has received. In particular, in addition to the mentioned Lenin Komsomol Prize, many times he received the Max Planck Society Fellowship, to carry out research in Germany; the JSPS Fellowship for Senior Scientists, to carry out research in Japan, Center of Excellency Professorship from the University of Tokyo and Kyushu University, Japan;  Honorary Doctor of Philosophy from the Yamaguchi University, Japan; and numerous invitations for Visiting Professorships from the best Universities all around the world.

We congratulate Michael on his double anniversary and wish him to have many happy, fruitful years ahead, new fundamental discoveries, and talented disciples. We believe this Special Issue constitutes a timely celebration of our respected scholar, researcher, and friend. Furthermore, we hope that the Special Issue inspires scholars, especially junior researchers, to continue the advancement in physics.

Prof. Dr. Andrey Miroshnichenko
Prof. Dr. Boris Malomed
Prof. Dr. Fernando Moreno
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (7 papers)

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Article
Description of Nonlinear Vortical Flows of Incompressible Fluid in Terms of a Quasi-Potential
Physics 2021, 3(4), 799-813; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/physics3040050 - 22 Sep 2021
Viewed by 271
Abstract
As it was shown earlier, a wide class of nonlinear 3-dimensional (3D) fluid flows of incompressible viscous fluid can be described by only one scalar function dubbed the quasi-potential. This class of fluid flows is characterized by a three-component velocity field having a [...] Read more.
As it was shown earlier, a wide class of nonlinear 3-dimensional (3D) fluid flows of incompressible viscous fluid can be described by only one scalar function dubbed the quasi-potential. This class of fluid flows is characterized by a three-component velocity field having a two-component vorticity field. Both these fields may, in general, depend on all three spatial variables and time. In this paper, the governing equations for the quasi-potential are derived and simple illustrative examples of 3D flows in the Cartesian coordinates are presented. The generalisation of the developed approach to the fluid flows in the cylindrical and spherical coordinate frames represents a nontrivial problem that has not been solved yet. In this paper, this gap is filled and the concept of a quasi-potential to the cylindrical and spherical coordinate frames is further developed. A few illustrative examples are presented which can be of interest for practical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dedication to Professor Michael Tribelsky: 50 Years in Physics)
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Communication
Enhanced Chiral Mie Scattering by a Dielectric Sphere within a Superchiral Light Field
Physics 2021, 3(3), 747-756; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/physics3030046 - 02 Sep 2021
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Abstract
A superchiral field, which can generate a larger chiral signal than circularly polarized light, is a promising mechanism to improve the capability to characterize chiral objects. In this paper, Mie scattering by a chiral sphere is analyzed based on the T-matrix method. The [...] Read more.
A superchiral field, which can generate a larger chiral signal than circularly polarized light, is a promising mechanism to improve the capability to characterize chiral objects. In this paper, Mie scattering by a chiral sphere is analyzed based on the T-matrix method. The chiral signal by circularly polarized light can be obviously enhanced due to the Mie resonances. By employing superchiral light illumination, the chiral signal is further enhanced by 46.8% at the resonance frequency. The distribution of the light field inside the sphere is calculated to explain the enhancement mechanism. The study shows that a dielectric sphere can be used as an excellent platform to study the chiroptical effects at the nanoscale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dedication to Professor Michael Tribelsky: 50 Years in Physics)
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Article
Instability of Traveling Pulses in Nonlinear Diffusion-Type Problems and Method to Obtain Bottom-Part Spectrum of Schrödinger Equation with Complicated Potential
Physics 2021, 3(3), 715-727; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/physics3030043 - 30 Aug 2021
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Abstract
The instability of traveling pulses in nonlinear diffusion problems is inspected on the example of Gunn domains in semiconductors. Mathematically, the problem is reduced to the calculation of the “energy” of the ground state in the Schrödinger equation with a complicated potential. A [...] Read more.
The instability of traveling pulses in nonlinear diffusion problems is inspected on the example of Gunn domains in semiconductors. Mathematically, the problem is reduced to the calculation of the “energy” of the ground state in the Schrödinger equation with a complicated potential. A general method to obtain the bottom-part spectrum of such equations based on the approximation of the potential by square wells is proposed and applied. Possible generalization of the approach to other types of nonlinear diffusion equations is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dedication to Professor Michael Tribelsky: 50 Years in Physics)
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Article
Scaling Conjecture Regarding the Number of Unknots among Polygons of N≫1 Edges
Physics 2021, 3(3), 664-668; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/physics3030039 - 12 Aug 2021
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Abstract
The conjecture is made based on a plausible, but not rigorous argument, suggesting that the unknot probability for a randomly generated self-avoiding polygon of N1 edges has only logarithmic, and not power law corrections to the known leading exponential law: [...] Read more.
The conjecture is made based on a plausible, but not rigorous argument, suggesting that the unknot probability for a randomly generated self-avoiding polygon of N1 edges has only logarithmic, and not power law corrections to the known leading exponential law: Punknot(N)expN/N0+o(lnN) with N0 being referred to as the random knotting length. This conjecture is consistent with the numerical result of 2010 by Baiesi, Orlandini, and Stella. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dedication to Professor Michael Tribelsky: 50 Years in Physics)
Article
Design of Switchable On/Off Subpixels for Primary Color Generation Based on Molybdenum Oxide Gratings
Physics 2021, 3(3), 655-663; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/physics3030038 - 12 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Structural color emerges from the interaction of light with structured matter when its dimension is comparable to the incident wavelength. The reflected color can be switched by controlling such interaction with materials whose properties can be changed through external stimuli such as electrical, [...] Read more.
Structural color emerges from the interaction of light with structured matter when its dimension is comparable to the incident wavelength. The reflected color can be switched by controlling such interaction with materials whose properties can be changed through external stimuli such as electrical, optical, or thermal excitation. In this research, a molybdenum oxide (MoOx) reflective grating to get a switchable on/off subpixel is designed and analyzed. The design is based on subpixel on and off states that could be controlled through the oxidation degree of MoOx. A suitable combination of three of these subpixels, optimized to get a control of primary colors, red, green, and blue, can lead to a pixel which can cover a wide range of colors in the color space for reflective display applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dedication to Professor Michael Tribelsky: 50 Years in Physics)
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Communication
Emergence of Many Mini-Circles from a Coffee Suspension with Mechanical Rotation
Physics 2021, 3(1), 8-16; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/physics3010003 - 22 Jan 2021
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Abstract
Drying of an aqueous suspension containing fine granules leads to the formation of a circular pattern, i.e., the coffee-ring effect. Here, we report the effect of mechanical rotation with drying of an aqueous suspension containing a large amount of granular particles as in [...] Read more.
Drying of an aqueous suspension containing fine granules leads to the formation of a circular pattern, i.e., the coffee-ring effect. Here, we report the effect of mechanical rotation with drying of an aqueous suspension containing a large amount of granular particles as in the Turkish coffee. It was found that wavy fragmented stripes, or a “waggly pattern”, appear in the early stage of the drying process and a “polka-dot pattern” with many small circles is generated in the late stage. We discuss the mechanism of these patterns in terms of the kinetic effect on micro phase-segregation. We suggest that the waggly pattern is induced through a mechanism similar to spinodal decomposition, whereas polka-dot formation is accompanied by the enhanced segregation of a water-rich phase under mechanical rotation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dedication to Professor Michael Tribelsky: 50 Years in Physics)
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Spontaneous Curvature Induced Stretching-Bending Mode Coupling in Membranes
Physics 2021, 3(2), 367-371; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/physics3020025 - 14 May 2021
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Abstract
In this paper, a simple example to illustrate what is basically known from the Gauss’ times interplay between geometry and mechanics in thin shells is presented. Specifically, the eigen-mode spectrum in spontaneously curved (i.e., up-down asymmetric) extensible polymerized or elastic membranes is studied. [...] Read more.
In this paper, a simple example to illustrate what is basically known from the Gauss’ times interplay between geometry and mechanics in thin shells is presented. Specifically, the eigen-mode spectrum in spontaneously curved (i.e., up-down asymmetric) extensible polymerized or elastic membranes is studied. It is found that in the spontaneously curved crystalline membrane, the flexural mode is coupled to the acoustic longitudinal mode, even in the harmonic approximation. If the coupling (proportional to the membrane spontaneous curvature) is strong enough, the coupled modes dispersions acquire the imaginary part, i.e., effective damping. The damping is not related to the entropy production (dissipation); it comes from the redistribution of the energy between the modes. The curvature-induced mode coupling makes the flexural mode more rigid, and the acoustic mode becomes softer. As it concerns the transverse acoustical mode, it remains uncoupled in the harmonic approximation, keeping its standard dispersion law. We anticipate that the basic ideas inspiring this study can be applied to a large variety of interesting systems, ranging from still fashionable graphene films, both in the freely suspended and on a substrate states, to the not yet fully understood lipid membranes in the so-called gel and rippled phases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dedication to Professor Michael Tribelsky: 50 Years in Physics)
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