Special Issue "Urban Climate Change, Transport Geography and Smart Cities"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Air, Climate Change and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jun Yang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Urban Climate and Human Settlements Research Lab, Jangho Architecture College, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110169, China
Interests: urban climate change; transport geography; land use and cover change; smart city
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Bing Xue
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) Potsdam, 14467 Potsdam, Germany
Interests: human–natural system and sustainability; urbanization
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Jianhong (Cecilia) Xia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845, 92667563, Australia
Interests: geographic information systems; spatial analysis and modelling; public transport development; driving; spatial navigation and wayfinding; human mobility
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Dongqi Sun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Regional Sustainable Development Modeling, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS, Beijing 100101, China
Interests: urban planning and transport geography; urbanization; smart city
Dr. Ye Wei
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Geographical Sciences, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, China
Interests: network complexity; urban network; smart city; transport geography
Dr. Zhi Qiao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350, China
Interests: urban climate; remote sensing; land use; cover change
Dr. Enxu Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jangho Architecture College, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110169, China
Interests: smart tourism; tourism urbanization; urban network accessibility; urban geography and urban planning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue (SI) welcomes high-level papers on the impact of transportation geography and smart cities on urban climate change, with the goal of addressing and mitigating urban climate risks. The most prominent urban climate risk is the development of urban heat islands (UHIs). As one of the most obvious characteristics of urban climate risk caused by urban construction and human activity, including the energy consumptions resulting from urban transportation and urban operation, UHIs constitute heat accumulation in urban areas due to their higher surface temperature compared with the surrounding suburbs and rural regions. The inappropriate urban spatial expansion will also accelerate the development of this UHIs effect. Correspondingly, smart urban growth will realize the adaptation and mitigation of climate change considering urban spatial growth. These smart growths may improve traffic emissions, reconstruct urban ecological landscape features, and even build sponge cities, and finally realize the adaptation and mitigation of urban climate change. Papers can be related to fundamental and theoretical studies and/or applications. Papers that put emphasis on the spatiotemporal process, genetic mechanism, prediction simulation, and optimal control of urban climate by taking transportation geography and smart cities into account are welcome. Smart urban growth will first address energy consumption, commuting and other industries with high heat emission.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • New methods for studying the spatiotemporal process, genetic mechanism, prediction simulation, and optimal control of urban climate.
  • Innovative finding on the relationship between transport geography and urban climate.
  • The investigation of smart city impacts on urban climate.
  • Predicting and modelling urban climate.
  • Cooling effects of green and blue spaces.
  • Mitigation and adaptation measures of urban climate.
  • Complex network analysis of tourism
  • Theories, methods and applications related to urban traffic complexity research.
  • Balanced Urban and Rural Development.
  • Tourism Transportation Network (roads, railways, airports) and Urban Development.
  • Influence of Tourism Climate Change on the Behavior Choice of Tourists.
  • Influence of Tourism Traffic Accessibility on Urban Tourism Network.

Dr. Jun Yang
Dr. Bing Xue
Assoc. Pro Jianhong (Cecilia) Xia
Dr. Dongqi Sun
Dr. Ye Wei
Dr. Zhi Qiao
Dr. Enxu Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • local climate zones
  • urban climate
  • urban climate change
  • urban climate mitigation and adaptation
  • urban heat islands
  • urban thermal environment
  • land surface temperatures
  • city traffic
  • jobs–housing balance
  • anthropogenic heat emission
  • smart urban growth
  • urban morphology
  • urban composition and configuration
  • impervious surface area
  • building energy consumption
  • urban planning and governance
  • high-speed rail and urban development
  • tourism network
  • tourism climate change
  • transportation accessibility

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
How Does China’s New Consumption Era Reshape Residents’ Shopping Behaviors from the Perspective of Community in Hohhot, China
Sustainability 2021, 13(14), 7599; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13147599 - 07 Jul 2021
Viewed by 542
Abstract
In the new consumption era, the popularization and application of information technology has continuously enriched residents’ consumption channels, gradually reshaping their consumption concepts and shopping behaviors. In this paper, Hohhot is taken as a case study, using open-source big data and field survey [...] Read more.
In the new consumption era, the popularization and application of information technology has continuously enriched residents’ consumption channels, gradually reshaping their consumption concepts and shopping behaviors. In this paper, Hohhot is taken as a case study, using open-source big data and field survey data to theorize the characteristics and mechanism of residents’ shopping behaviors in different segments of consumers based on geography. First, communities were divided into five types according to their location and properties: main communities in urban areas (MCs), historical communities in urban areas (HCs), high-grade communities in the outskirts of the city (HGCs), mid-grade communities in urban peripheries (MGCs), and urban villages (UVs). On this basis, a structural equation model is used to explore the characteristics of residents’ shopping behaviors and their influencing mechanisms in the new consumption era. The results showed that: (1) The online shopping penetration rate of residents in UVs and HCs is lowest, and that of residents in HGC is highest. (2) The types of products purchased in online and offline shopping by different types of community show certain differences. (3) From the perspective of influencing mechanisms, residents’ characteristics directly affect their shopping behaviors and, indirectly (through the choice of community where they live and their consumption attitudes), their differences in shopping behaviors. Different properties of communities cannot directly affect residents’ shopping behaviors, but they can affect them indirectly by influencing consumption attitudes and then affect such behaviors. Typical consumption attitudes of the new era, such as shopping for luxuries and emerging consumption, have the most significant and direct influence on shopping behaviors, as well as an intermediate and variable influence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Climate Change, Transport Geography and Smart Cities)
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Article
Comparison of Usage and Influencing Factors between Governmental Public Bicycles and Dockless Bicycles in Linfen City, China
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6890; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13126890 - 18 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 393
Abstract
Automobile traffic has shifted the use of bicycles in many developed regions to being mainly for sport, recreation and commuting. Due to the desire to mitigate the impacts of climate change and alleviate traffic jams, bicycle sharing is booming in China. Governmental public [...] Read more.
Automobile traffic has shifted the use of bicycles in many developed regions to being mainly for sport, recreation and commuting. Due to the desire to mitigate the impacts of climate change and alleviate traffic jams, bicycle sharing is booming in China. Governmental public bicycles and dockless bicycles are the main types of bicycle sharing in China, each with different types of management and pricing. Field research has found that many bicycle sharing networks are idle and wasteful, and thus we investigated which type is more popular and suitable for Chinese cities. This research comparatively analyzes the application of governmental public bicycles and dockless bicycles, mainly focusing on the cycling destination, cycling frequency, and cycling factors, taking Linfen City as an example. The results show that: (1) The purpose is different between governmental public bicycles and dockless bicycles. On the one hand, the aim of riding a governmental public bicycle to work represents the largest proportion at about 29%, mainly because of the fixed route of travel, and the fact that the fixed placement of governmental public bicycles makes them more available compared to the random arbitrariness of dockless bicycles. On the other hand, the aim of riding a dockless bicycle for entertainment accounts for the largest proportion, at about 34%, mainly due to the ease of borrowing and returning a bike, and mobile payment. (2) In terms of frequency, the public’s choice of riding a dockless bicycle or a governmental public bicycle has no essential difference, given that there are only two options for citizens in Linfen. (3) The response to the two kinds of bicycle sharing is different; the governmental public bicycle has the advantage of lower cost, but the dockless bicycle has more advantages in the procedure of borrowing and returning the bicycle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Climate Change, Transport Geography and Smart Cities)
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Article
Spatial–Temporal Heterogeneity and the Related Influencing Factors of Tourism Efficiency in China
Sustainability 2021, 13(11), 5825; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13115825 - 21 May 2021
Viewed by 548
Abstract
Tourism efficiency is an effective index of measuring the development quality of the tourism industry. In this study, the tourism efficiency of 30 provinces in China during the period from 2006 to 2018 was measured with the SBM model and Malmquist index. On [...] Read more.
Tourism efficiency is an effective index of measuring the development quality of the tourism industry. In this study, the tourism efficiency of 30 provinces in China during the period from 2006 to 2018 was measured with the SBM model and Malmquist index. On the basis of ESDA and GWR models, we explored the spatial pattern of China’s tourism efficiency and the spatial heterogeneity of the influencing factors in depth. The results revealed that China’s tourism efficiency has been constantly enhanced with an increasingly balanced pattern. Meanwhile, the utilization degrees of various input factors have constantly been improving. Both technological efficiency and technological progress jointly promote rapid growth of total-factor productivity. Accompanied with constant enhancement of the spatial agglomeration effect, the local spatial pattern also showed obvious differentiation. In general, low-efficiency regions were mainly concentrated in northern China, while high-efficiency regions were concentrated in southern China. The distinct spatial–temporal differentiation characteristics of tourist economic efficiency can be attributed to different influencing strengths of various factors in various regions and different action tendencies. The level of economic development, traffic conditions, the professional level of tourism, and openness degree can significantly promote tourism efficiency. Tourism resource endowment and environmental cost impose slight effects and differ in action direction, thereby inhibiting the tourism efficiency of many regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Climate Change, Transport Geography and Smart Cities)
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Article
A Vector Map of Carbon Emission Based on Point-Line-Area Carbon Emission Classified Allocation Method
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 10058; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su122310058 - 02 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 649
Abstract
An explicit spatial carbon emission map is of great significance for reducing carbon emissions through urban planning. Previous studies have proved that, at the city scale, the vector carbon emission maps can provide more accurate spatial carbon emission estimates than gridded maps. To [...] Read more.
An explicit spatial carbon emission map is of great significance for reducing carbon emissions through urban planning. Previous studies have proved that, at the city scale, the vector carbon emission maps can provide more accurate spatial carbon emission estimates than gridded maps. To draw a vector carbon emission map, the spatial allocation of greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is crucial. However, the previous methods did not consider different carbon sources and their influencing factors. This study proposes a point-line-area (P-L-A) classified allocation method for drawing a vector carbon emission map. The method has been applied in Changxing, a representative small city in China. The results show that the carbon emission map can help identify the key carbon reduction regions. The emission map of Changxing shows that high-intensity areas are concentrated in four industrial towns (accounting for about 80%) and the central city. The results also reflect the different carbon emission intensity of detailed land-use types. By comparison with other research methods, the accuracy of this method was proved. The method establishes the relationship between the GHG inventory and the basic spatial objects to conduct a vector carbon emission map, which can better serve the government to formulate carbon reduction strategies and provide support for low-carbon planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Climate Change, Transport Geography and Smart Cities)
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Article
Impacts of Neighboring Buildings on the Cold Island Effect of Central Parks: A Case Study of Beijing, China
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9499; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12229499 - 15 Nov 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 599
Abstract
Urban parks have been considered as an effective measure to mitigate the urban heat island (UHI) effects. Many studies have investigated the impacts of shape, size and interior components on the cold island effect (CIE) of parks, while little attention has been given [...] Read more.
Urban parks have been considered as an effective measure to mitigate the urban heat island (UHI) effects. Many studies have investigated the impacts of shape, size and interior components on the cold island effect (CIE) of parks, while little attention has been given to the impact of neighboring buildings. Thus, taking twenty-two parks in Beijing as samples, this study investigated the impacts of the neighboring building on the CIE of central parks. The results showed that the average land surface temperature (LST) of parks are 30.98 °C in summer and −1.10 °C in winter. Parks have a strong CIE in summer, and average cold island footprint (CIF) and LST difference are 0.15 km2 and 2.01 °C higher than that in winter. The components of the building in the CIF of parks are dominated by middle-rise building (MRB), followed by low-rise building (LRB), and high-rise building (HRB) is the least dominant. The percentage of landscape (PLAND) and landscape shape index (LSI) of MRB, and perimeter area fractal dimension (PAFRAC) of LRB are significantly related to CIF in summer and winter. This study could extend scientific understanding of the impacts of neighboring buildings on the CIE of central parks, and could guide urban planners in mitigating the UHI effects through the rational allocation of buildings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Climate Change, Transport Geography and Smart Cities)
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