Special Issue "Wastewater Reuse and Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mustafa Al Aukidy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mustansiriyah University, Baghdad,Iraq; Department of Engineering, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara, Italy
Interests: water treatment, wastewater treatment, hospital wastewater, wastewater reuse, micropollutants, environmental risks
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Paola Verlicchi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara, Italy
Interests: wastewater treatment and options for reuse; occurrence of contaminants of emerging concern in water; removal of pharmaceuticals from wastewater; hospital effluent management and treatment; polishing treatments; constructed wetlands; disinfection
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the scarcity of fresh water resources, the reuse of wastewater could be a sustainable option to alleviate the water shortage in different parts of the worlds, and so far, the the reuse of wastewater in various sectors has been implemented, with the most popular in the field of agricultural irrigation.

The main advantages of reusing treated wastewater are the availability, the low cost of irrigating agricultural land, and the fact of being a constant source of water. Other benefits of wastewater reuse are the ability to use nutrients in wastewater, reducing the use of fertilizers, solving problems associated with wastewater disposal, and recharging groundwater. So today, the practice of wastewater reuse is adopted in various countries as part of sustainable water management.

There is no common regulation of wastewater reuse worldwide due to different climatic, geological and geographical conditions, water resources, type of crops and soil characteristics, socio and economic aspects and political strategies. Some countries and organizations have already established standards for reuse such as US EPA, California, WHO, FAO, France, Jordan, Tunisia and Italy. Most developing countries have adopted national standards based on the guidelines set by FAO, WHO, California, etc.

This Special Issue will include a selection of papers that promot sustainable development of wastewater management in agriculture, industrial and urban reuse. Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a rigorous peer-review process with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Dr. Mustafa Al Aukidy
Prof. Paola Verlicchi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wastewater reuse
  • wastewater management
  • sustainability
  • agricultural reuse
  • industrial reuse
  • advanced wastewater treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Fermentation of Washed Rice Water Increases Beneficial Plant Bacterial Population and Nutrient Concentrations
by , , and
Sustainability 2021, 13(23), 13437; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su132313437 (registering DOI) - 04 Dec 2021
Abstract
Washed rice water (WRW) is said to be a beneficial plant fertilizer because of its nutrient content. However, rigorous scientific studies to ascertain its efficiency are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of fermenting WRW on the bacterial [...] Read more.
Washed rice water (WRW) is said to be a beneficial plant fertilizer because of its nutrient content. However, rigorous scientific studies to ascertain its efficiency are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of fermenting WRW on the bacterial population and identification, and to measure how fermentation affects the nutrient composition of WRW. Rice grains were washed in a volumetric water-to-rice ratio of 3:1 and at a constant speed of 80 rpm for all treatments. The treatments were WRW fermented at 0 (unfermented), 3, 6, and 9 days. Bacterial N fixation and P and K solubilization abilities in the fermented WRW were assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively. The isolated bacterial strains and the WRW samples were also tested for catalase and indole acetic acid (IAA) production ability. Significantly greater N fixation, P and K solubilization, and IAA production were recorded after 3 days of fermentation compared with other fermentation periods, with increases of 46.9–83.3%, 48.2–84.1%, 73.7–83.6%, and 13.3–85.5%, respectively, in addition to the highest (2.12 × 108 CFU mL−1) total bacterial population. Twelve bacteria strains were isolated from the fermented WRW, and the gene identification showed the presence of beneficial bacteria Bacillus velezensis, Enterobacter spp., Pantoea agglomerans, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia at the different fermentation periods. All the identified microbes (except Enterobacter sp. Strain WRW-7) were positive for catalase production. Similarly, all the microbes could produce IAA, with Enterobacter spp. strain WRW-10 recording the highest IAA of up to 73.7% higher than other strains. Generally, with increasing fermentation periods, the nutrients N, S, P, K, Mg, NH4+, and NO3 increased, while pH, C, and Cu decreased. Therefore, fermentation of WRW can potentially increase plant growth and enhance soil health because of WRW’s nutrients and microbial promotional effect, particularly after 3 days of fermentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wastewater Reuse and Sustainability)
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Review

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Review
Environmental, Economic, and Social Potentialities of Ornamental Vegetation Cultivated in Constructed Wetlands of Mexico
Sustainability 2021, 13(11), 6267; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13116267 - 01 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 842
Abstract
Sustainable development implies the proper use of natural resources, such as water resources, but the environmental, economic, and social benefits should also be considered. In the water sector, for example, sanitation is one of the challenges that arise in rural localities. However, issues [...] Read more.
Sustainable development implies the proper use of natural resources, such as water resources, but the environmental, economic, and social benefits should also be considered. In the water sector, for example, sanitation is one of the challenges that arise in rural localities. However, issues related to it may be solved with the use of constructed wetlands (CWs), which may allow the cultivation of ornamental plants with phytoremediation properties. Through a content analysis, the environmental, economic, and social potential of ornamental species used in Mexico for phytoremediation in CWs is documented in this study. The environmental potential of the plants was considered based on their phytoremediation properties. The economic potential was determined from research articles and from the National Agri-Food Information System. The social potential was analyzed considering the ornamental and artisanal use of the plants. In total, 21 species of phytoremediation plants were identified. Anthurium andreanum and Zantedeschia aethiopica stand out for their commercial value, reported in 2018 to be 272,875 and 30,318 USD, respectively, at the national level. The social potential was identified by the ornamental or artisanal use for flower arrangements and weaving. This study reveals that the use of CWs with ornamental vegetation is a sustainable option to clean wastewater, reuse water, and generate economic incentives. Thus, it is essential to provide the community with adequate training for the management of CWs in those sites that lack treatment systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wastewater Reuse and Sustainability)
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