Special Issue "State-of-the-Art Virology Research in Croatia"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "General Virology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Stipan Jonjić
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Histology and Embryology and Center for Proteomics, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Medicine, Croatia; Center of Excellence for Viral Immunology and Vaccines, CERVirVac, Croatia
Interests: MCMV; immunobiology of perinatal CMV infection of CNS; transcriptomic approach to viral disease; viral evasion
Dr. Dubravko Forčić
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Research and Knowledge Transfer in Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia; Center of Excellence for Viral Immunology and Vaccines, CERVirVac, Croatia
Interests: paramyxoviruses; molecular epidemiology; genetic variability; mumps virus
Dr. Andreja Ambriović-Ristov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory for Cell Biology and Signalling, Division of Molecular Biology, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička 54, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: adenoviral vectors; adenovirus retargeting; integrin; adhesion; adhesome; cell migration; integrin-mediated cancer cell chemoresistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Croatian scientists actively participate in fundamental studies of different viral pathogens such as herpesviruses, adenoviruses, papillomaviruses, arboviruses, flaviviruses, rotaviruses, hantaviruses, and several others, and are focused on virology, viral immunology, pathogenesis, viral genetic diversity, and evolution. Furthermore, Croatian scientists' research efforts also include developing novel viral and vaccine vectors, intensive investigations of papillomavirus-induced oncogenesis and molecular epidemiology of several human viral pathogens as well as investigations of viral zoonoses and the diversity of plant viruses and subviral pathogens, and their impact on the ecosystems. In addition, Croatia has a scientific center of excellence dedicated towards virology, the Center of Excellence for Viral Immunology and Vaccines, which hosts several research groups at the University of Rijeka and at the University of Zagreb and aims to develop into a vital cornerstone for further development of viral immunology and vaccinology in Croatia. The Center for Excellence's principal activities include studies of basic mechanisms of virus control, viral evasion of the immune response, and the design of effective novel viral vaccines and vaccine vectors. Furthermore, following the emergence of COVID-19 pandemics, significant activity in coronaviruses research, mainly supported through specific calls by the Croatian Science Foundation, is taking place in Croatia as well. This Special Issue aims to provide an overview of research in virology and viral pathogenesis within the country, and we invite colleagues to contribute reviews or original research articles related to their research.

Prof. Dr. Stipan Jonjić
Dr. Dubravko Forčić
Dr. Andreja Ambriović-Ristov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human, animal and plant viruses
  • viral evolution and genetics
  • viral entry, assembly and release
  • viral pathogenesis
  • viral vectors
  • virus and host cell interaction
  • immune response to viruses and viral immunoevasion
  • viral diagnostics, therapy and interventions

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Human Bocavirus Detected in Croatian Children with Respiratory Infection
Viruses 2021, 13(9), 1728; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13091728 - 31 Aug 2021
Viewed by 497
Abstract
Human bocavirus (HBoV) 1 is considered an important respiratory pathogen, while the role of HBoV2-4 in clinical disease remains somewhat controversial. Since, they are characterized by a rapid evolution, worldwide surveillance of HBoVs’ genetics is necessary. This study explored the prevalence of HBoV [...] Read more.
Human bocavirus (HBoV) 1 is considered an important respiratory pathogen, while the role of HBoV2-4 in clinical disease remains somewhat controversial. Since, they are characterized by a rapid evolution, worldwide surveillance of HBoVs’ genetics is necessary. This study explored the prevalence of HBoV genotypes in pediatric patients with respiratory tract infection in Croatia and studied their phylogeny. Using multiplex PCR for 15 respiratory viruses, we investigated 957 respiratory samples of children up to 18 years of age with respiratory tract infection obtained from May 2017 to March 2021 at two different hospitals in Croatia. Amplification of HBoV near-complete genome or three overlapping fragments was performed, sequenced, and their phylogenetic inferences constructed. HBoV was detected in 7.6% children with a median age of 1.36 years. Co-infection was observed in 82.2% samples. Sequencing was successfully performed on 29 HBoV positive samples, and all belonged to HBoV1. Croatian HBoV1 sequences are closely related to strains isolated worldwide, and no phylogenetic grouping based on mono- or co-infection cases or year of isolation was observed. Calculated rates of evolution for HBoV1 were 10−4 and 10−5 substitutions per site and year. Recombination was not detected among sequences from this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Virology Research in Croatia)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Molecular Characterization of Human Papillomavirus Type 159 (HPV159)
Viruses 2021, 13(8), 1668; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13081668 - 23 Aug 2021
Viewed by 542
Abstract
Human papillomavirus type 159 (HPV159) was identified in an anal swab sample and preliminarily genetically characterized by our group in 2012. Here we present a detailed molecular in silico analysis that showed that the HPV159 viral genome is 7443 bp in length and [...] Read more.
Human papillomavirus type 159 (HPV159) was identified in an anal swab sample and preliminarily genetically characterized by our group in 2012. Here we present a detailed molecular in silico analysis that showed that the HPV159 viral genome is 7443 bp in length and divided into five early and two late genes, with conserved functional domains and motifs, and a non-coding long control region (LCR) with significant regulatory sequences that allow the virus to complete its life cycle and infect novel host cells. HPV159, clustering into the cutaneotropic Betapapillomavirus (Beta-PV) genus, is phylogenetically most similar to HPV9, forming an individual phylogenetic group in the viral species Beta-2. After testing a large representative collection of clinical samples with HPV159 type-specific RT-PCR, in addition to the anal canal from which the first HPV159 isolate was obtained, HPV159 was further detected in other muco-cutaneous (4/181, 2.2%), mucosal (22/764, 2.9%), and cutaneous (14/554, 2.5%) clinical samples, suggesting its extensive tissue tropism. However, because very low HPV159 viral loads were estimated in the majority of positive samples, it seemed that HPV159 mainly caused clinically insignificant infections of the skin and mucosa. Using newly developed, highly sensitive HPV159-specific nested PCRs, two additional HPV159 LCR viral variants were identified. Nevertheless, all HPV159 mutations were demonstrated outside important functional domains of the LCR, suggesting that the HPV159 viral variants were most probably not pathogenically different. This complete molecular characterization of HPV159 enhances our knowledge of the genome characteristics, tissue tropism, and phylogenetic diversity of Beta-PVs that infect humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Virology Research in Croatia)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Cytomegalovirus Infection and Inflammation in Developing Brain
Viruses 2021, 13(6), 1078; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13061078 - 04 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 973
Abstract
Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a highly prevalent herpesvirus that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals and immunologically immature fetuses and newborns. Most infected newborns are able to resolve the infection without developing sequelae. However, in severe cases, congenital HCMV infection can result [...] Read more.
Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a highly prevalent herpesvirus that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals and immunologically immature fetuses and newborns. Most infected newborns are able to resolve the infection without developing sequelae. However, in severe cases, congenital HCMV infection can result in life-threatening pathologies and permanent damage of organ systems that possess a low regenerative capacity. Despite the severity of the problem, HCMV infection of the central nervous system (CNS) remains inadequately characterized to date. Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) show strict species specificity, limiting the use of HCMV in experimental animals. Infection following intraperitoneal administration of mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) into newborn mice efficiently recapitulates many aspects of congenital HCMV infection in CNS. Upon entering the CNS, CMV targets all resident brain cells, consequently leading to the development of widespread histopathology and inflammation. Effector functions from both resident cells and infiltrating immune cells efficiently resolve acute MCMV infection in the CNS. However, host-mediated inflammatory factors can also mediate the development of immunopathologies during CMV infection of the brain. Here, we provide an overview of the cytomegalovirus infection in the brain, local immune response to infection, and mechanisms leading to CNS sequelae. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Virology Research in Croatia)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop