Special Issue "Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) in Plant and Soil Microbiome under the Changing Environment"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanism and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Qinglin Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
Interests: antimicrobial resistance; soil microbiology; plant microbiome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has been recognized as a major health issue of global concerns of the 21st century. Emerging evidence suggests that the environment is the single largest source and reservoir of antibiotic resistance determinants. Currently, more than 700,000 people die globally per year from antibiotic-resistant diseases, and if no action is taken, more than 10 million deaths per year are projected by 2050. At its heart, the influence of antibiotic resistance on human, animal, and plant health and welfare, as well as its ecological and economic consequences, has reinforced the need for a concerted effort to track and control its emergence and dissemination

Despite a longstanding interest in this topic, currently, we lack a comprehensive understanding of how environmental resistomes change in the context of a changing environment as well as the contribution of the environmental state factors to those changes. This Special Issue will center on metagenomic and population genomic studies on the environmental resistome and its connection to environmental state factors. We are especially interested in the processes that drive the dissemination of AMR between soil and plant.

Dr. Qinglin Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance
  • soil microbiology
  • plant microbiome

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Molecular Epidemiology of Fosfomycin Resistant E. coli from a Pigeon Farm in China
Antibiotics 2021, 10(7), 777; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10070777 - 25 Jun 2021
Viewed by 298
Abstract
We determined the prevalence and molecular characteristics of fosfomycin-resistant Escherichia coli from a domestic pigeon farm. A total of 79 samples collected from pigeons and their surrounding environments were screened for the presence of fosfomycin resistant isolates and these included 49 E. coli [...] Read more.
We determined the prevalence and molecular characteristics of fosfomycin-resistant Escherichia coli from a domestic pigeon farm. A total of 79 samples collected from pigeons and their surrounding environments were screened for the presence of fosfomycin resistant isolates and these included 49 E. coli isolates that displayed high-level resistance (MIC ≥ 256 mg L−1) and carried the fosA3 gene on plasmids with sizes ranging from 80 to 370 kb. MLST analysis of these fosA3-positive E. coli isolates indicated the presence of nine sequence types (ST6856, ST8804, ST457, ST746, ST533, ST165, ST2614, ST362 and ST8805) of which ST6856 was the most prevalent (24.5%, 12/49). PFGE combined with genomic context comparative analyses indicated that the fosA3 gene was spread by horizontal transfer as well as via clonal transmission between E. coli in the pigeon farm, and IS26 played an important role in fosA3 transmission. The high prevalence of fosA3 in the pigeon farm and the high similarity of the fosA3 genomic environment between E. coli isolates from humans and pigeons indicated that the pigeon farm served as a potential reservoir for human infections. The pigeon farm was found to be an important reservoir for the fosA3 gene and this should be further monitored. Full article
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