Special Issue "Antimicrobial Activity of Natural Products and Plants"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant-Derived Antibiotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multidrug resistance has become a huge challenge for healthcare worldwide and remains one of the leading causes of human mortality over the past few years. Bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses have consecutively been developing numerous resistant mechanisms against current antibiotics, hampering the success of anti-infectious therapies, and thus leading to severe consequences for patients’ health. In addition, the use of synthetic chemicals to control microorganisms is still limited due to their carcinogenic effects, acute toxicity, and environmental hazards. Hence, there is an urgent demand for new antibiotics from the scientific community to address multidrug resistance. Therapeutic agents from herbal medicines have long emerged as a potential natural source for treating infectious diseases. Today, many of these compounds have not only been rediscovered but are also the subject of new applications, nanoparticles, activity against microbial biofilms and effects on genomics, and have been discovered for new antifungal or antiviral properties.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • new natural antimicrobial compounds and their antimicrobial effects
  • clinical applications
  • animal production and food storage applications
  • antifungal properties
  • antiviral properties
  • antimicrobial mechanisms
  • combination with other antimicrobials
  • effects and possible global changes of the human microbiome
  • new formulations based on essential oils with clinical applications for use in infectious diseases

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Review
Comparative Studies on Different Extraction Methods of Centella asiatica and Extracts Bioactive Compounds Effects on Antimicrobial Activities
Antibiotics 2021, 10(4), 457; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10040457 - 17 Apr 2021
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Abstract
The interest of consumers in using products containing phytochemicals derived from plants is growing day by day due to the shift of consumers’ preferences from convenience to environmental sustainability. One plant utilized in many products is Centella asiatica, a herb commonly used [...] Read more.
The interest of consumers in using products containing phytochemicals derived from plants is growing day by day due to the shift of consumers’ preferences from convenience to environmental sustainability. One plant utilized in many products is Centella asiatica, a herb commonly used in folk medicine, health supplements, and beauty products. Extraction of bioactive compounds from C. asiatica was performed using conventional methods and modern methods (e.g., microwave or ultrasound-assisted and subcritical water extraction). This review summarizes the variety of methods used to extract active compounds from C. asiatica, their influence on the bioactive compounds and antimicrobial activity in vitro and in vivo, and the safety and toxicology of C. asiatica extract. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Activity of Natural Products and Plants)
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Review
Plant-Derivatives Small Molecules with Antibacterial Activity
Antibiotics 2021, 10(3), 231; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10030231 - 25 Feb 2021
Viewed by 673
Abstract
The vegetal world constitutes the main factory of chemical products, in particular secondary metabolites like phenols, phenolic acids, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Many of these compounds are small molecules with antibacterial activity, although very few are actually in the market as antibiotics for clinical [...] Read more.
The vegetal world constitutes the main factory of chemical products, in particular secondary metabolites like phenols, phenolic acids, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Many of these compounds are small molecules with antibacterial activity, although very few are actually in the market as antibiotics for clinical practice or as food preservers. The path from the detection of antibacterial activity in a plant extract to the practical application of the active(s) compound(s) is long, and goes through their identification, purification, in vitro and in vivo analysis of their biological and pharmacological properties, and validation in clinical trials. This review presents an update of the main contributions published on the subject, focusing on the compounds that showed activity against multidrug-resistant relevant bacterial human pathogens, paying attention to their mechanisms of action and synergism with classical antibiotics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Activity of Natural Products and Plants)
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