Special Issue "Antimicrobial Therapies and Biological Responses"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Toshiya Morozumi
Website
Guest Editor
Division of Periodontology, Department of Oral Interdisciplinary Medicine, Graduate School of Dentistry, Kanagawa Dental University, Yokosuka 238-8580, Japan
Interests: Antimicrobial therapy and immunological response; Alteration of intestinal flora due to bacteremia; Relationship between systemic disease and periodontitis
Dr. Fumihiko Yoshino
Website
Guest Editor
Division of Photomedical Dentistry, Department of Oral Science, Graduate School of Dentistry, Kanagawa Dental University, Yokosuka 238-8580, Japan
Interests: Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy using blue light for oral diseases; Anti-aging effects of antioxidants in pharmacology; Reactive oxygen species analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antimicrobial treatments for bacterial infections are performed as a causative or adjunctive therapy for various diseases. Broadly, it includes antibacterial drugs, antimicrobial photodynamic therapy, and bactericidal peptide. With the decrease of targeted bacteria by antimicrobial treatment, inflammation is suppressed and biological responses such as cytokine secretion or bacterial flora are improved. However, the details related to the mechanism of action of antimicrobial therapy, its effective use, and biological responses have not been fully elucidated. This Special Issue invites articles on antimicrobial therapy and their spread and evolution, including but not limited to the following topics:

  • Antimicrobial therapy and immunological response (e.g., immune cells and soluble factors including cytokines and complement)
  • Antimicrobial therapy and microbiological response (e.g., composition of the microbial community)
  • The evolution and spread of known method of antimicrobial therapy and the emergence of new treatments (e.g., antimicrobial photodynamic therapy and bactericidal peptide)

Dr. Toshiya Morozumi
Dr. Fumihiko Yoshino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial therapy
  • Dental treatment
  • Oral care
  • Immunological response
  • Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy
  • Bacteral flora
  • Drug delivery system

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy on Organic Solution and Root Surface In Vitro
Antibiotics 2021, 10(2), 101; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10020101 - 21 Jan 2021
Abstract
Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (a-PDT) is attracting attention as a new form of dental treatment. While it is primarily applied to produce an antibacterial effect, it decreases lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and protease activity. Here, we evaluated differences in the antibacterial activity of a-PDT on three [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (a-PDT) is attracting attention as a new form of dental treatment. While it is primarily applied to produce an antibacterial effect, it decreases lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and protease activity. Here, we evaluated differences in the antibacterial activity of a-PDT on three types of bacteria and the effects on the organic substances (i.e., albumin and LPS). Furthermore, we investigated the effects of a-PDT on root surfaces. A FotoSan630® and toluidine blue were used to perform a-PDT in this study. We measured its antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis, Streptococcus mutans, and Enterococcus faecalis. Antimicrobial testing revealed strong antimicrobial action and P. gingivalis, E. faecalis, and S. mutans were almost undetectable after 50, 120, and 100 s, respectively. In organic resolution tests, albumin was significantly decreased from 1 min after a-PDT application onward, while LPS significantly decreased at 5 min after the application. The root surfaces after a-PDT were confirmed to be cleaner than the controls without suffering any damage. Depending on the bacterial species, a-PDT exhibited antimicrobial activity against various types of bacteria and sensitivity differed. Moreover, we reported that a-PDT resolves protein and LPS, enabling the formation of a healthy root surface without any damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Therapies and Biological Responses)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Macrolides restrain osteoclastogenesis and inflammation by upregulating homeostatic protein DEL-1
Authors: Hikaru Tamura; Tomoki Maekawa*; Hisanori Domon; Takumi Hiyoshi; Toshihito Isono; Daisuke Yonezawa; Karin Sasagawa; Takeyasu Maeda; Naoki Takahashi; Koichi Tabeta; Yutaka Terao
Affiliation: Niigata University, Japan

Title: Effects of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy on Organic Resolution and Root Surface in vitro
Authors: Yuji Matsushima1; Akihiro Yashima1; Meri Fukaya1; Satoshi Shirakawa1; Tomoko Oshima2; Tomomi Kawai2; Takatoshi Nagano1; Kazuhiro Gomi1
Affiliation: 1 Department of Periodontology, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine, 2-1-3 Tsurumi, Tsurumi ku, Yokohama, Japan 230 2 Department of Oral Microbiology, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine, 2-1-3 Tsurumi, Tsurumi ku, Yokohama, Japan 230
Abstract: Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (a-PDT) is garnering attention as a new form of dental treatment. While it is mainly applied as an antibacterial effect, it also reportedly lowers LPS and protease activity. Here, we evaluated differences in antibacterial activity by a-PDT to bacterial types and effects on organic substances such as albumin and LPS. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of a-PDT on root surface. FotoSan630® and toluidine blue were used to perform a-PDT in this experiment. We measured its antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis. Antimicrobial testing revealed strong antimicrobial action against bacteria, with P. gingivalis, E. faecalis, and S. mutans almost undetectable after 50 seconds, 120 seconds and 100 seconds, respectively. In organic resolution tests, Albumin decreased significantly from 1 minute after a-PDT application onward, while lipopolysaccharides (LPS) had decreased significantly at 5 minutes after application. The root surfaces applied a-PDT was confirmed to be cleaner than in the controls without suffering any damage. On this study, a-PDT exhibits antimicrobial activity against various types of bacteria, sensitivity differs depending on the species of bacteria. We also found that a-PDT resolves protein and LPS, enabling the formation of a healthy root surface without any damage.

Title: Control effect of oral bacterial flora by natural antibacterial ingredient catechin
Authors: Muneaki Tamura; Noriaki Kamio; Kuniyasu Ochiai; Kenichi Imai
Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Division of Immunology and Pathobiology, Dental Research Center, Nihon University School of Dentistry

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