ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Health-Related Quality of Life and Chronic Diseases: A Call to Action"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Rosalia Ragusa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health Direction of Policlinic Hospital, 95100 Catania, Italy
Interests: infectious disease and nosocomial infections; involvement of nurses and health workers in the fight against hospital infections; hematology and oncology in children; hospital management; epidemiology and public health; quality of life
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, the prevalence of chronic diseases has increased considerably, with a growing number of people suffering from this type of diseases that have a significant impact on their general quality of life. Quality of life is defined by the World Health Organization as “an individual's perception of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns”. It is a multidisciplinary construct that is influenced by various factors, such as physical health, psychological state, personal beliefs, social relationships, and relationship to the environment. Currently, there is growing interest in the impact of diseases and therapies on patients’ quality of life. In this case, we refer specifically to the construct of the health-related quality of life (HRQOL), which consists of at least three broad domains—physical, psychological, and social functioning—that are affected by one’s disease and/or treatment. In this regard, a patient’s quality of life is an important measure of treatment effectiveness, particularly for chronic diseases such as cancer, where recovery is not necessarily indicative of satisfactory treatment and the patient’s own wellbeing is not necessarily aligned with the possibility of a permanent cure. Although previous studies have already been conducted on HRQOL of patients affected by chronic diseases, knowledge in this field is still very limited. Therefore, further studies are needed in order to further investigate the impact of chronic diseases on patients’ quality of life and which factors and interventions may improve this relevant outcome. In the light of these considerations, this Special Issue aims to publish both original articles and comprehensive reviews about the complex relationship between quality of life and chronic diseases, with particular reference to theoretical models and intervention tools. Space will also be given to the clinical applications of the construct in relation to the different types of chronic diseases and the impact on patients’ psychological wellbeing.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

• HRQOL theoretical models;

• HRQOL assessment;

• HRQOL and chronic diseases;

• HRQOL and treatments;

• HRQOL in oncological patients;

• HRQOL in patients with chronic infectious diseases;

• HRQOL and psychological wellbeing in patients with chronic diseases.

Dr. Rosalia Ragusa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Perceived Stress in Relation to Quality of Life and Resilience in Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 536; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020536 - 11 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1259
Abstract
Background: Patients with chronic kidney disease undergo various stages of therapeutic adaptation which involve lifestyle modifications, physical changes, and adjustment to renal replacement therapy. This process produces adaptive stress. Objective: To identify how resilience, health- related quality of life, and sociodemographic, clinical, [...] Read more.
Background: Patients with chronic kidney disease undergo various stages of therapeutic adaptation which involve lifestyle modifications, physical changes, and adjustment to renal replacement therapy. This process produces adaptive stress. Objective: To identify how resilience, health- related quality of life, and sociodemographic, clinical, and hemodialysis routine-related variables are related to perceived stress in patients with chronic kidney disease receiving hemodialysis for more than six months. Methods: This was a multicenter and cross-sectional study involving 144 patients from the Valencian Community (Spain). The assessment scales used for the study were the Perceived Stress Scale 10, the Kidney Disease Quality of Life 36, and the Connors–Davidson Resilience Scale. To identify variables with predictive power over Perceived Stress Scale 10 scores, multiple regression analyses were performed. Results: Employment status (p = 0.003), resilience (p < 0.001), and quality of life (p < 0.001) were shown to be significantly related to perceived stress. The regression models determined that health-related quality of life and resilience explained up to 27.1% of the variance of total PSS10 scores. Conclusions: Resilience was identified as one of the most important predictors of Perceived Stress Scale 10 scores. Thus, the development of interventions to promote resilience may have a positive impact on perceived stress in patients with chronic kidney disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Related Quality of Life and Chronic Diseases: A Call to Action)
Article
Association between Satisfaction with Life and Personality Types A and D in Young Women with Acne Vulgaris
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8524; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17228524 - 17 Nov 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 810
Abstract
People with acne vulgaris report a lower level of satisfaction with life and are more frequently classified as having Type D personalities than those without acne. This research examined, for the first time, the moderating and mediating role of personality type in the [...] Read more.
People with acne vulgaris report a lower level of satisfaction with life and are more frequently classified as having Type D personalities than those without acne. This research examined, for the first time, the moderating and mediating role of personality type in the relationship between acne severity and satisfaction with life. Among 300 female nursing and cosmetology students ranging in age from 19 to 24 years (M = 21.28, SD = 1.39), 150 individuals (50%) presented with symptoms of acne vulgaris (AV group), while the other 150 (50%) were categorized as controls without acne vulgaris (WAV sample). A cross-sectional study was conducted using three self-report questionnaires: The Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), the Framingham Type A Scale (FTAS), and the Type D Scale (DS14). Acne vulgaris was clinically diagnosed using the Hellgren–Vincent Scale (HVS). The AV group scored significantly higher on the FTAS and DS14 and lower on the SWLS than the WAV sample. Life satisfaction correlated negatively with both the negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI) subscales of the DS14. The moderating role of the Type A behavioral pattern (TABP) and the mediating role of both NA and SI subscales of the DS14 were observed in the relationship between acne severity and satisfaction with life. The type of personality may explain the mechanism of the relationship between acne disease and subjective well-being. Therefore, psychological interventions and strategies focused on managing stress and mood may effectively improve satisfaction with life in people with acne. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Related Quality of Life and Chronic Diseases: A Call to Action)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Latent Health Risk Classes Associated with Poor Physical and Mental Outcomes in Workers with COPD from Central Appalachian U.S. States
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6798; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17186798 - 17 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1223
Abstract
Adults who work in the Central Appalachian region of the United States (U.S.) are disproportionately affected by Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). While there is a socio-demographic profile of adults with COPD who are at increased risk for physical and mental distress, the [...] Read more.
Adults who work in the Central Appalachian region of the United States (U.S.) are disproportionately affected by Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). While there is a socio-demographic profile of adults with COPD who are at increased risk for physical and mental distress, the risk factors that uniquely affect the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of Central Appalachian workers with COPD are unknown. Therefore, we conducted a latent class analysis of 2016 and 2017 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from 1326 currently employed adults with COPD living in four U.S. states (KY, NC, TN, and WV) within the Central Appalachian Region. Drawing from the social ecological model, we identified associations between theoretically informed risk indicators—comorbid health conditions, substance use and abuse, and limited access to healthcare—on three HRQoL variables, including infrequent (0–13 days) or frequent (≥14 days) physical distress, mental distress, and limited activity due to poor health over the past 30 days. Workers at high risk for comorbid conditions reported more frequent physical distress, mental distress, and activity limitations as compared to those at low risk. Workers reporting difficulty accessing healthcare were no more likely to report physical or mental distress when compared to workers with adequate access to healthcare; however, those with limited healthcare access did report more frequent activity limitation due to poor health. Interestingly, workers with COPD at high risk for substance use and abuse were no more likely to report poor HRQoL outcomes compared to those at low risk. Our findings have important implications for addressing indicators of poor health among Central Appalachian workers with COPD, especially those living with multiple comorbidities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Related Quality of Life and Chronic Diseases: A Call to Action)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Bidirectional Influence of the COVID-19 Pandemic Lockdowns on Health Behaviors and Quality of Life among Chinese Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5575; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17155575 - 02 Aug 2020
Cited by 45 | Viewed by 3991
Abstract
Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has created challenges that have caused profound changes in health behaviors. This study aimed to explore how COVID-19 is affecting the health-related quality of life (QoL) among Chinese adults. Methods: The data of health-related behaviors and [...] Read more.
Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has created challenges that have caused profound changes in health behaviors. This study aimed to explore how COVID-19 is affecting the health-related quality of life (QoL) among Chinese adults. Methods: The data of health-related behaviors and QoL were collected via online surveys from 2289 adults (mean age = 27.8 ± 12 years) who had been isolated at home for an average of 77 days. Results: More than 50% of the respondents reported that their time engaged in daily physical activity (PA) decreased, while sedentary behavior (SB) time increased compared with that before the lockdown. Only 20% of the respondents reported engaging in moderate-to-vigorous PA, 23% of adults reported changed their diets to be healthier, and 30% reported consuming more vegetables, fruits, and milk products than before home-isolation. During home-isolation, 75.2% of the adults rated their sleep quality as very good, and 65% reported that they were satisfied with their QoL. Sleep quality mediated the relationship between PA and QoL. Conclusion: The two-to-three-month home-isolation has had mixed effects on adult health behaviors in China. The participants were found to have focused more on their eating quality and patterns, which had a positive influence on their QoL. However, people should be encouraged to exercise at home with limited space to maintain a generally healthy lifestyle during a prolonged quarantine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Related Quality of Life and Chronic Diseases: A Call to Action)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Quality of Life in Liver Transplant Recipients: A Retrospective Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3809; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17113809 - 27 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1034
Abstract
Background: This study aims to investigate the quality of life and the therapeutic compliance of the patients who received a liver transplant, from a living or deceased donor, at IRCCS ISMETT in the last three years. Liver transplantation is an effective therapeutic strategy [...] Read more.
Background: This study aims to investigate the quality of life and the therapeutic compliance of the patients who received a liver transplant, from a living or deceased donor, at IRCCS ISMETT in the last three years. Liver transplantation is an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with end-stage liver failure. The quality of life (QOL) of liver disease patients is placed under considerable stress due to the debilitating clinical conditions and related issues experienced in everyday life by these individuals. The concept of QOL is being increasingly used to define the individual perception of health, including physical, mental, and social wellbeing. The success of a liver transplant should therefore be intended not only in terms of survival, but also of recovery of a satisfying quality of life. For this reason, our liver transplant recipients are closely monitored and supported from a psychological standpoint. This is done to monitor their ability to adapt to and comply with their clinical condition and to verify their gradual resumption of their path of life Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data collected by the IRCCS ISMETT Clinical Psychology Service during routine psychological follow-up of liver transplant recipients. Data refer to 82 patients who received a liver transplant between January 2017 and September 2019 and describe their QOL and therapeutic adherence. The obtained results were compared with the main studies on this issue available in literature. Results: Ninety-four percent of liver transplant recipients reported high mean scores of quality of life and therapeutic adherence 28% of patients reported at least one persistent annoying symptom after transplantation, although in some cases this did not affect the overall QOL. The results also refer to patients with a pre-transplant diagnosis of alcohol-related cirrhosis, who confirm their complete abstinence from alcohol. Conclusions: Our results confirm the efficacy of the liver transplantation to achieve of a good QOL. Furthermore, these patients seem to maintain high therapeutic adherence, thus ensuring a good outcome of the care received during the transplantation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Related Quality of Life and Chronic Diseases: A Call to Action)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Gender Differences and Quality of Life in Parkinson’s Disease
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 198; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010198 - 29 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1317
Abstract
Parkinson’s disease has been found to significantly affect health-related quality of life. The gender differences of the health-related quality of life of subjects with Parkinson’s disease have been observed in a number of studies. These differences have been reported in terms of the [...] Read more.
Parkinson’s disease has been found to significantly affect health-related quality of life. The gender differences of the health-related quality of life of subjects with Parkinson’s disease have been observed in a number of studies. These differences have been reported in terms of the age at onset, clinical manifestations, and response to therapy. In general, women with Parkinson’s disease showed more positive disease outcomes with regard to emotion processing, non-motor symptoms, and cognitive functions, although women report more Parkinson’s disease-related clinical manifestations. Female gender predicted poor physical functioning and socioemotional health-related quality of life, while male gender predicted the cognitive domain of health-related quality of life. Some studies reported gender differences in the association between health-related quality of life and non-motor symptoms. Depression and fatigue were the main causes of poorer health-related quality of life in women, even in the early stages of Parkinson’s disease. The aim of this review was to collect the best available evidence on gender differences in the development of Parkinson’s disease symptoms and health-related quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Related Quality of Life and Chronic Diseases: A Call to Action)
Review
Quality of Life Changes in Acute Coronary Syndromes Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6889; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17186889 - 21 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 879
Abstract
There is little up-to-date evidence about changes in quality of life following treatment for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. The main aim of this review was to assess the changes in QoL in ACS patients after treatment. We undertook a systematic review and [...] Read more.
There is little up-to-date evidence about changes in quality of life following treatment for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. The main aim of this review was to assess the changes in QoL in ACS patients after treatment. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of quantitative studies. The search included studies that described the change of QoL of ACS patients after receiving treatment options such as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and medical therapy (MT). We synthesized findings using content analysis and pooled the estimates using meta-analysis. We used the PRISMA guidelines to select and appraise the studies and report the findings. Twenty-nine (29) articles were included in the review. We found a significant improvement of QoL in ACS patients after receiving treatment. Particularly, the meta-analytic association found that the mean QoL of patients diagnosed with ACS was higher after receiving treatment compared to baseline (overall pooled mean difference = 31.88; 95% CI = 31.64–52.11, I2 = 98) with patients on PCI having slightly lower QoL gains (pooled mean difference = 30.22; 95% CI = 29.9–30.53, I2 = 0%) compared to those on CABG (pooled mean difference = 34.01; 95% CI = 33.66–34.37, I2 = 0%). The review confirmed that QoL of ACS patients improved after receiving treatment therapies although varied by the treatment options and patients’ preferences. This suggests the need to perform further study on the QoL, patient preferences and physicians’ decision to prescription of treatment options. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Related Quality of Life and Chronic Diseases: A Call to Action)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
The Burden of Endometriosis on Women’s Lifespan: A Narrative Overview on Quality of Life and Psychosocial Wellbeing
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4683; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17134683 - 29 Jun 2020
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 2344
Abstract
Endometriosis is a chronic, inflammatory disease affecting more than 170 million women worldwide and up to 10% of women of reproductive age. As a consequence of inflammatory reaction and infiltration of anatomic structures, endometriosis can cause “pain symptoms” including dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, dyschezia, dysuria, [...] Read more.
Endometriosis is a chronic, inflammatory disease affecting more than 170 million women worldwide and up to 10% of women of reproductive age. As a consequence of inflammatory reaction and infiltration of anatomic structures, endometriosis can cause “pain symptoms” including dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, dyschezia, dysuria, and chronic pelvic pain. In this review, we summarized the impact of endometriosis on quality of life in all its aspects including sexual life, work, and social relationships. The data research was conducted using web-based search engines and/or various electronic research databases querying for all articles related to endometriosis and quality of life from the inception of the database up to February 2020. Endometriosis has not only physical but also psychological effects, causing depression, anxiety, and compromising social relationships. Furthermore, endometriosis negatively impacts sexual life and social relationships. At last, the economic burden of endometriosis should not be underestimated, both individually and for the community, as this pathology leads to a loss of productivity at work and large use of health resources. Thus, endometriosis-related symptoms control women’s lives compromising the quality of life in all aspects. In this review, we summarized the impact of endometriosis on various aspects of women’s lives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health-Related Quality of Life and Chronic Diseases: A Call to Action)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop