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Special Issue "Metabonomics in Gastroenterology and Hepatology"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Ole Haagen Nielsen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dept. of Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark
Dr. Jacob Tveiten Bjerrum
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Herlev Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Medical Section, HerlevRingvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark
Interests: gastroenterology; hepatology; nflammatory bowel disease; Metabonomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Throughout the past two decades attempts have been made to reveal the true nature of a rang of puzzeling diseases within gastroenterology and hepatology using different kinds of omics. However, the dissection of genotype-phenotype relations have often been disappointing due to various downstream regulatory processes that take place from the genome to the metabolome, i.e. epigenome, epitranscriptome, epiproteome and the concomitant interactions with the exposome, e.g. nutrients, medication, and pollution, and the microbiome. Thus, the complexity of the network increases towards the metabolome and the read-out from the metabolome comprises information that is much closer to a meaningful patho/physiological phenotype.

With this special Issue of the International Journal of Molecular Sciences we wish to invite original papers and reviews that focus on metabonomics in gastroenterology and hepatology. The primary objective is to get insight into the pathophysiological molecular mechanisms at play in given disease phenotypes using metabonomics alone or in an integrative approach, i.e. in combination with other omics. However, papers on diagnostics, prognostics, biomarker identification, and treatment response biomarkers are welcome. Both human and animal models are appreciated.

Prof. Ole Haagen Nielsen
Dr. Jacob Tveiten Bjerrum
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomarkers
  • diagnostics
  • disease phenotype
  • gastroenterology
  • hepatology
  • metabonomics
  • metabolomics
  • pathophysiology prognostics
  • treatment response biomarkers

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Metabonomics in Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(15), 3638; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms20153638 - 25 Jul 2019
Viewed by 1294
Abstract
Attempts have been made to reveal the true nature of a range of puzzling diseases within gastroenterology and hepatology using different kinds of omics, namely genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabonomics [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabonomics in Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Article
A Metabologenomic Approach Reveals Changes in the Intestinal Environment of Mice Fed on American Diet
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(12), 4079; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms19124079 - 17 Dec 2018
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2733
Abstract
Intestinal microbiota and their metabolites are strongly associated with host physiology. Developments in DNA sequencing and mass spectrometry technologies have allowed us to obtain additional data that enhance our understanding of the interactions among microbiota, metabolites, and the host. However, the strategies used [...] Read more.
Intestinal microbiota and their metabolites are strongly associated with host physiology. Developments in DNA sequencing and mass spectrometry technologies have allowed us to obtain additional data that enhance our understanding of the interactions among microbiota, metabolites, and the host. However, the strategies used to analyze these datasets are not yet well developed. Here, we describe an original analytical strategy, metabologenomics, consisting of an integrated analysis of mass spectrometry-based metabolome data and high-throughput-sequencing-based microbiome data. Using this approach, we compared data obtained from C57BL/6J mice fed an American diet (AD), which contained higher amounts of fat and fiber, to those from mice fed control rodent diet. The feces of the AD mice contained higher amounts of butyrate and propionate, and higher relative abundances of Oscillospira and Ruminococcus. The amount of butyrate positively correlated with the abundance of these bacterial genera. Furthermore, integrated analysis of the metabolome data and the predicted metagenomic data from Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States (PICRUSt) indicated that the abundance of genes associated with butyrate metabolism positively correlated with butyrate amounts. Thus, our metabologenomic approach is expected to provide new insights and understanding of intestinal metabolic dynamics in complex microbial ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabonomics in Gastroenterology and Hepatology)
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Article
In-and-Out Molecular Changes Linked to the Type 2 Diabetes Remission after Bariatric Surgery: An Influence of Gut Microbes on Mitochondria Metabolism
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(12), 3744; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms19123744 - 24 Nov 2018
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2580
Abstract
Different kinds of gastrointestinal tract modulations known as “bariatric surgery” are actually the most effective treatment for obesity and associated co-morbidities, such as type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The potential causes of those effects have yet to be explained. In our study, we focused [...] Read more.
Different kinds of gastrointestinal tract modulations known as “bariatric surgery” are actually the most effective treatment for obesity and associated co-morbidities, such as type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The potential causes of those effects have yet to be explained. In our study, we focused on molecular changes evoked by laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy leading to T2DM remission. Two complementary metabolomics techniques, namely, liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were used to study those effects in a group of 20 obese patients with T2DM selected from a cohort of 372 obese individuals who underwent bariatric surgery and did not receive anti-diabetic treatment afterward. Modified levels of carnitines, lipids, amino acids (including BCAA) and α- and β-hydroxybutyric acids were detected. Presented alterations suggest a major role of mitochondria activity in T2DM remission process. Moreover, some of the observed metabolites suggest that changes in gut microbiota composition may also correlate with the tempo of diabetes recovery. Additional analyses confirmed a relationship between biochemical and clinical parameters and the aforementioned metabolites, thereby, highlighting a role of mitochondria and microbes. Our data suggests that there is a previously undescribed relationship between mitochondria and gut microbiota, which changes after the bariatric surgery. More investigations are needed to confirm and explore the observed findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabonomics in Gastroenterology and Hepatology)
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Article
Fingerprinting Acute Digestive Diseases by Untargeted NMR Based Metabolomics
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(11), 3288; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms19113288 - 23 Oct 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1551
Abstract
Precision medicine may significantly contribute to rapid disease diagnosis and targeted therapy, but relies on the availability of detailed, subject specific, clinical information. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H–NMR) spectroscopy of body fluids can extract individual metabolic fingerprints. Herein, we studied 64 [...] Read more.
Precision medicine may significantly contribute to rapid disease diagnosis and targeted therapy, but relies on the availability of detailed, subject specific, clinical information. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H–NMR) spectroscopy of body fluids can extract individual metabolic fingerprints. Herein, we studied 64 patients admitted to the Florence main hospital emergency room with severe abdominal pain. A blood sample was drawn from each patient at admission, and the corresponding sera underwent 1H–NMR metabolomics fingerprinting. Unsupervised Principal Component Analysis (PCA) analysis showed a significant discrimination between a group of patients with symptoms of upper abdominal pain and a second group consisting of patients with diffuse abdominal/intestinal pain. Prompted by this observation, supervised statistical analysis (Orthogonal Partial Least Squares–Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA)) showed a very good discrimination (>90%) between the two groups of symptoms. This is a surprising finding, given that neither of the two symptoms points directly to a specific disease among those studied here. Actually herein, upper abdominal pain may result from either symptomatic gallstones, cholecystitis, or pancreatitis, while diffuse abdominal/intestinal pain may result from either intestinal ischemia, strangulated obstruction, or mechanical obstruction. Although limited by the small number of samples from each of these six conditions, discrimination of these diseases was attempted. In the first symptom group, >70% discrimination accuracy was obtained among symptomatic gallstones, pancreatitis, and cholecystitis, while for the second symptom group >85% classification accuracy was obtained for intestinal ischemia, strangulated obstruction, and mechanical obstruction. No single metabolite stands up as a possible biomarker for any of these diseases, while the contribution of the whole 1H–NMR serum fingerprint seems to be a promising candidate, to be confirmed on larger cohorts, as a first-line discriminator for these diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabonomics in Gastroenterology and Hepatology)
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