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Special Issue "The Role of Natural Compounds in Osteoblastic and Osteoclastic Cells"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Seon-Yong Jeong
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Guest Editor
Dr. Eunkuk Park
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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Medical Genetics, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
Interests: osteoporosis; osteoarthritis; obesity; woman's menopause; cognitive impairment; phytomedicine; natural compounds; animal study

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Osteoporosis is an abnormal bone remodeling condition characterized by decreased bone density, which leads to high risks of fracture. It is a common disease caused by an imbalance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Osteoporosis is a major concern in public health care, and causes severe consequences if left untreated. Although a few potent pharmacological therapies are available for the treatment of osteoporosis, most of these drugs have side effects. Herbal treatment for osteoporosis would be advantageous because natural plants have fewer side effects, making them more suitable for long‐term use. The preventive and therapeutic effects of phytochemicals, as potential alternative treatments for osteoporosis, have been reported.

We are particularly interested in manuscripts that describe the role of natural compounds in the bone remodeling process through the induction of osteoblast differentiation and/or the reduction of osteoclast differentiation. Therefore, this Special Issue will focus on the mode of action (molecular mechanisms) underlying the anti-osteoporotic effects of natural compounds. Original research articles, reviews, and letters on these topics are welcome in this Special Issue. It is also necessary to clarify the exact functional ingredient in the submitted research papers. We will not accept papers on mixed extraction.

Dr. Seon-Yong Jeong

Dr. Eunkuk Park
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • osteoporosis
  • fracture
  • herbal medicine
  • phytotherapy
  • natural compounds
  • molecular mechanism
  • bone remodeling
  • bone formation
  • bone resorption
  • osteoblasts
  • osteoclasts

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Anti-Osteoporotic Effect of Morroniside on Osteoblast and Osteoclast Differentiation In Vitro and Ovariectomized Mice In Vivo
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(19), 10642; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms221910642 - 30 Sep 2021
Viewed by 252
Abstract
Bone remodeling is a continuous process of bone synthesis and destruction that is regulated by osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Here, we investigated the anti-osteoporotic effects of morroniside in mouse preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells and mouse primary cultured osteoblasts and osteoclasts in vitro and ovariectomy (OVX)-induced [...] Read more.
Bone remodeling is a continuous process of bone synthesis and destruction that is regulated by osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Here, we investigated the anti-osteoporotic effects of morroniside in mouse preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells and mouse primary cultured osteoblasts and osteoclasts in vitro and ovariectomy (OVX)-induced mouse osteoporosis in vivo. Morroniside treatment enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and positively stained cells via upregulation of osteoblastogenesis-associated genes in MC3T3-E1 cell lines and primary cultured osteoblasts. However, morroniside inhibited tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity and TRAP-stained multinucleated positive cells via downregulation of osteoclast-mediated genes in primary cultured monocytes. In the osteoporotic animal model, ovariectomized (OVX) mice were administered morroniside (2 or 10 mg/kg/day) for 12 weeks. Morroniside prevented OVX-induced bone mineral density (BMD) loss and reduced bone structural compartment loss in the micro-CT images. Taken together, morroniside promoted increased osteoblast differentiation and decreased osteoclast differentiation in cells, and consequently inhibited OVX-induced osteoporotic pathogenesis in mice. This study suggests that morroniside may be a potent therapeutic single compound for the prevention of osteoporosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Natural Compounds in Osteoblastic and Osteoclastic Cells)
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Article
Effects of 4-Hexylresorcinol on Craniofacial Growth in Rats
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(16), 8935; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22168935 - 19 Aug 2021
Viewed by 352
Abstract
4-Hexylresorcinol (4HR) has been used as a food additive, however, it has been recently demonstrated as a Class I histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). Unlike other HDACi, 4HR can be taken through foods. Unfortunately, some HDACi have an influence on craniofacial growth, therefore, the [...] Read more.
4-Hexylresorcinol (4HR) has been used as a food additive, however, it has been recently demonstrated as a Class I histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). Unlike other HDACi, 4HR can be taken through foods. Unfortunately, some HDACi have an influence on craniofacial growth, therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 4HR on craniofacial growth. Saos-2 cells (osteoblast-like cells) were used for the evaluation of HDACi and its associated activities after 4HR administration. For the evaluation of craniofacial growth, 12.8 mg/kg of 4HR was administered weekly to 4 week old rats (male: 10, female: 10) for 12 weeks. Ten rats were used for untreated control (males: 5, females: 5). Body weight was recorded every week. Serum and head samples were collected at 12 weeks after initial administration. Craniofacial growth was evaluated by micro-computerized tomography. Serum was used for ELISA (testosterone and estrogen) and immunoprecipitation high-performance liquid chromatography (IP-HPLC). The administration of 4HR (1–100 μM) showed significant HDACi activity (p < 0.05). Body weight was significantly different in male rats (p < 0.05), and mandibular size was significantly smaller in 4HR-treated male rats with reduced testosterone levels. However, the mandibular size was significantly higher in 4HR treated female rats with increased growth hormone levels. In conclusion, 4HR had HDACi activity in Saos-2 cells. The administration of 4HR on growing rats showed different responses in body weight and mandibular size between sexes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Natural Compounds in Osteoblastic and Osteoclastic Cells)
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