Special Issue "Nutritional Surveillance and Nutritional Cohort Study in China"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 March 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Gangqiang Ding
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100050, China
Interests: balance dietary; metabolic syndrome; nutrition evaluation; nutrition education
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the economic, social and cultural development, and the process of urbanization and aging population, China has been experiencing the nutrition transition characterized as a double burden of undernutrition and over-nutrition. Through regular implementation of a national nutrition survey to track the dynamics of nutritional status among Chinese population, China has conducted six rounds of this national nutrition survey between 1982 and 2017, and 30-years cohort of China Health and Nutrition Survey since 1989. A wide range of research based on all above data provides solid scientific evidence for policy-making, nutrition and health promotion, as well as disease prevention and control in China. The future Special Issue will publish a series of articles covering relevant topics from dynamics of dietary intake, dietary pattern, lifestyles, and nutrition transition to their potential association with obesity and related NCD. These studies provide insights on multi-dimensional assessment of diet, nutrition and health status, as well as sociodemographic roles among school-aged students, adults and elderly, respectively. Findings from the aforementioned studies will have very important implications for policy-making, strategy development and public health practice.

Prof. Dr. Gangqiang Ding
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutrition transition
  • dietary pattern
  • double burden of malnutrition
  • obesity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
The Relationship between Obligatory Exercise and Eating Attitudes, and the Mediating Role of Sociocultural Attitudes towards Appearance during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4286; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13124286 - 27 Nov 2021
Viewed by 438
Abstract
A strong sociocultural context could affect an individual’s aesthetic standards. In order to achieve a socially recognized ideal appearance, obligatory exercisers might increase dieting behavior when exercise actions are disturbed, thereby placing the individual at risk of eating disorders. The current study mainly [...] Read more.
A strong sociocultural context could affect an individual’s aesthetic standards. In order to achieve a socially recognized ideal appearance, obligatory exercisers might increase dieting behavior when exercise actions are disturbed, thereby placing the individual at risk of eating disorders. The current study mainly examined the relationship between obligatory exercise and eating attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic, and considered the mediating role of externalized sociocultural attitudes towards appearance between the two. A total of 342 participants (175 females, 167 males) from various regions of China were invited to fill out the questionnaires including the Obligatory Exercise Questionnaire, the Sociocultural Attitudes Toward Appearance Questionnaire-3, and the Eating Attitudes Test. In total, 51.5% of the participants presented symptoms of an obligatory exercise behavior. Among them, males, young adults, and the participants with lower BMI had higher OEQ scores, whereas females and young adults had higher EAT-26 scores. Meanwhile, 9.4% of the participants might have had an eating disorder. The OEQ score was positively correlated with the EAT-26 total score as well as SATAQ-3 ‘Pressures’ and ‘Information’ subscales. In addition, the EAT-26 total score was positively correlated with the SATAQ-3 ‘Pressures’ and ‘Information’ subscales. Externalized sociocultural attitudes towards appearance served as a mediator between obligatory exercise behavior and eating attitudes, and the mediation effect accounted for 56.82% of the total effect. Obligatory exercise behavior may have an indirect effect on eating attitudes through sociocultural attitudes towards appearance. Given the sociocultural information and pressures, in order to maintain or pursue an ideal appearance, many people tend to keep a pathological diet. Thus, forming a positive and healthy social aesthetic orientation is beneficial in helping obligatory exercisers to develop reasonable eating habits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Surveillance and Nutritional Cohort Study in China)
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