Special Issue "The Rehabilitative Role of Protein: Protein Intake and Recovery of Muscle Mass, Strength, and Function"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nancy R. Rodriguez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutritional Sciences, College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
Interests: protein intake; energy balance; protein utilization; protein quality; essential amino density; physical rehabilitation

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Rehabilitative nutrition is a term historically associated with clinical approaches for managing nutritional status in patients presenting with various pathologies associated with muscle wasting (e.g., cancer, AIDS, renal disease) to improve patient outcomes and decrease mortality. This approach has not been extended to individuals with muscle injury, recovering from orthopedic surgery procedures, or individuals with chronic diseases who experience losses in muscle mass and function. Only recently have traditional protein-specific sports nutrition initiatives aimed at muscle health been considered in the context of chronic disease and physical rehabilitation. In the proposed issue, ‘rehabilitative nutrition’ refers to dietary–protein-driven interventions that provide essential amino acids critical to attenuate the loss of muscle in various situations and physiological states and needed to support optimal gains in muscle mass, strength, and function.

Prof. Nancy R. Rodriguez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • rehabilitative nutrition
  • protein intake
  • protein quality
  • muscle injury
  • muscle mass
  • muscle function

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Short-Term Protein Supplementation Does Not Alter Energy Intake, Macronutrient Intake and Appetite in 50–75 Year Old Adults
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1711; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13051711 - 18 May 2021
Viewed by 1273
Abstract
Ageing is associated with a reduction in muscle mass and strength, termed sarcopenia. Dietary protein is important for the maintenance of muscle mass through the promotion of muscle protein synthesis. However, protein is also reported to be a highly satiating nutrient. This raises [...] Read more.
Ageing is associated with a reduction in muscle mass and strength, termed sarcopenia. Dietary protein is important for the maintenance of muscle mass through the promotion of muscle protein synthesis. However, protein is also reported to be a highly satiating nutrient. This raises concerns that protein intake for musculoskeletal health reasons in older adults may exacerbate age-related decreased appetite and may result in reduced energy and nutrient intake. This study aimed to investigate the effect of short-term protein supplementation and its timing (morning vs. evening), on energy and nutrient intake and appetite measures in middle-older age adults. Twenty-four 50–75 year olds were recruited to a randomised cross-over trial. In phase 1 (pre-supplementation) participants completed a food diary and reported hunger and appetite on three alternate days. During the second and third phases, participants consumed a 20 g whey protein gel (78 mL/368 kJ), for four days, either in the morning (after breakfast) or the evening (before bed), whilst completing the same assessments as phase 1. No differences in dietary intakes of energy, macronutrients and micronutrients were recorded when comparing the pre-supplementation phase to the protein supplementation phases, irrespective of timing (excluding the contribution of the protein supplement itself). Similarly, no differences were observed in self-reported feelings of hunger and appetite. In conclusion, a 20 g/day whey protein supplement given outside of meal-times did not alter habitual dietary intakes, hunger or appetite in this middle-older age adult population in the short-term. This approach may be a useful strategy to increasing habitual protein intake in the middle-older age population. Full article
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Review

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Review
Pre- and Post-Surgical Nutrition for Preservation of Muscle Mass, Strength, and Functionality Following Orthopedic Surgery
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1675; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13051675 - 15 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2949
Abstract
Nutritional status is a strong predictor of postoperative outcomes and is recognized as an important component of surgical recovery programs. Adequate nutritional consumption is essential for addressing the surgical stress response and mitigating the loss of muscle mass, strength, and functionality. Especially in [...] Read more.
Nutritional status is a strong predictor of postoperative outcomes and is recognized as an important component of surgical recovery programs. Adequate nutritional consumption is essential for addressing the surgical stress response and mitigating the loss of muscle mass, strength, and functionality. Especially in older patients, inadequate protein can lead to significant muscle atrophy, leading to a loss of independence and increased mortality risk. Current nutritional recommendations for surgery primarily focus on screening and prevention of malnutrition, pre-surgical fasting protocols, and combating post-surgical insulin resistance, while recommendations regarding macronutrient composition and timing around surgery are less established. The goal of this review is to highlight oral nutrition strategies that can be implemented leading up to and following major surgery to minimize atrophy and the resultant loss of functionality. The role of carbohydrate and especially protein/essential amino acids in combating the surgical stress cascade and supporting recovery are discussed. Practical considerations for nutrient timing to maximize oral nutritional intake, especially during the immediate pre- and post- surgical periods, are also be discussed. Full article
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