Special Issue "Interactions of Training Load, Nutrition and Psychological Interventions with Growth and Maturation in Youth Sports"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, School of Sport and Leisure, 4960-320 Melgaço, Portugal
Interests: football; soccer; match analysis; performance analysis; network analysis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Children and youth with the same chronological age may be very different in terms of maturation status. In fact, growth and maturation is an individual process with huge variation in adolescence. Therefore, for the same chronological age, children and youth may be significantly different in terms of their maturation status. This leads to remarkable variation in adolescents’ physical fitness, psychological profile, or physiological responses to external stressors.

Therefore, biological age should be considered as a factor playing an important role in youth sports and exercise. Talent selection, the implementation of training interventions or adjustments to training stimulus should be managed based on maturation status, more than considering the chronological age.

The training load imposed to youth athletes can be a determinant factor to ensure an individualized and healthy process in the development of youth. Eventually, we hope that the specific concerns regarding the impact on training load will be specifically addressed in a Special Issue, namely the impact of load on the injuries, illness or fitness development of these athletes. Multidisciplinary approaches should be also conducted, namely considering nutrition factors (dietary and supplementation) and psychological interventions that may help youth establish a healthier relationship with exercise.

Despite a good body of knowledge about growth and maturation in sports, there are still some areas that deserve more original research and others that require systematic reviews. Therefore, this Special Issue “Interactions of Training Load, Nutrition and Psychological Interventions with Growth and Maturation in Youth Sports” looks forward to receiving original studies, systematic reviews or meta-analyses that focus on the area of growth and maturation in sports and exercise, nutrition and psychological interventions, particularly considering the following topics: (i) the implications of maturation status for physical, technical and tactical performance in sports; (ii) the implications of maturation for injury and illness in sports; (iii) the role of maturation status in training interventions; (iv) maturation and its relationship with talent selection; (v) maturation and its role in motor learning and motor control; (vi) dietary factors and implications for youth athletes; (vii) the impact of training load on youth; and (viii) psychological interventions in youth sports.

Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
Dr. Ana Filipa Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • maturation
  • pediatric exercise
  • growth
  • youth sports
  • injuries and illness in sports
  • sports nutrition
  • psychological interventions

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Association between Training Load and Well-Being Measures in Young Soccer Players during a Season
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4451; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094451 - 22 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1055
Abstract
This study aimed to analyze the correlations among weekly (w) acute workload (wAW), chronic workload (wCW), acute/chronic workload ratio (wACWR), training monotony (wTM), training strain (wTS), sleep quality (wSleep), delayed onset muscle soreness (wDOMS), fatigue (wFatigue), stress (wStress), and Hooper index (wHI) in [...] Read more.
This study aimed to analyze the correlations among weekly (w) acute workload (wAW), chronic workload (wCW), acute/chronic workload ratio (wACWR), training monotony (wTM), training strain (wTS), sleep quality (wSleep), delayed onset muscle soreness (wDOMS), fatigue (wFatigue), stress (wStress), and Hooper index (wHI) in pre-, early, mid-, and end-of-season. Twenty-one elite soccer players (age: 16.1 ± 0.2 years) were monitored weekly on training load and well-being for 36 weeks. Higher variability in wAW (39.2%), wFatigue (84.4%), wStress (174.3%), and wHI (76.3%) at the end-of-season were reported. At mid-season, higher variations in wSleep (59.8%), TM (57.6%), and TS (111.1%) were observed. Moderate to very large correlations wAW with wDOMS (r = 0.617, p = 0.007), wFatigue, wStress, and wHI were presented. Similarly, wCW reported a meaningful large association with wDOMS (r = 0.526, p < 0.001); moderate to very large associations with wFatigue (r = 0.649, p = 0.005), wStress, and wHI. Moreover, wTM presented a large correlation with wSleep (r = 0.515, p < 0.001); and a negatively small association with wStress (r = −0.426, p = 0.003). wTS showed a small to large correlation with wSleep (r = 0.400, p = 0.005) and wHI; also, a large correlation with wDOMS (r = 0.556, p = 0.028) and a moderate correlation with wFatigue (r = 0.343, p = 0.017). Wellness status may be considered a useful tool to provide determinant elite players’ information to coaches and to identify important variations in training responses. Full article
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