Special Issue "The Expanding World of Prebiotics and Probiotics: Enter the Post-Biotics"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Prebiotics and Probiotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Stefano Guandalini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
Interests: Celiac Disease; Probiotics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Much progress has been made over the past several years in the field of pre- and probiotics, and in spite of some occasional skeptical feedback, probiotics in particular continue to advance in showing many unexpected properties (regarding their effects on mental status, pain resistance, etc.) and clinical efficacy.

In parallel to this, the relatively new field of post-biotics, defined as non-viable bacterial products or metabolic by-products from probiotic microorganisms that have biological activity in the host, is rapidly gaining momentum.

This Special Issue will focus on a wide range of aspects of postbiotics, from basic science to translational science and clinical application. As a result, we expect this to be a state-of-the-art update on all aspects of postbiotics that will be useful for scientists as well as practicing physicians.

Prof. Stefano Guandalini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Postbiotics
  • Probiotics
  • Prebiotics
  • Microbiome

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Effect of Heat-Killed Lactobacillus casei DKGF7 on a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 568; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13020568 - 09 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1111
Abstract
Non-viable bacteria, referred to as “paraprobiotics,” have attracted attention as potentially safer alternatives to probiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of heat-killed Lactobacillus casei DKGF7 on the symptomatic improvement of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in a rat disease [...] Read more.
Non-viable bacteria, referred to as “paraprobiotics,” have attracted attention as potentially safer alternatives to probiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of heat-killed Lactobacillus casei DKGF7 on the symptomatic improvement of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in a rat disease model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the beneficial effects of heat-killed probiotics. Seven male Wistar rats were induced with IBS by restraint stress and administered heat-killed L. casei DKGF7 for four weeks and then compared with seven rats in the control group. Stool consistency measured four weeks after initial treatment was the primary outcome measure. To investigate the mechanism of action of the heat-killed bacteria on IBS, we measured serum corticosterone levels, inflammatory cytokines in colon tissue, and expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs) in the epithelium. The treatment group showed significantly better stool consistency scores than the control group at week 4, as well as at every measured time point (all p values < 0.05). The treatment group showed lower serum corticosterone levels, lower colonic inflammatory cytokine levels, and higher expression of TJPs compared with the control group. Paraprobiotics such as heat-killed L. casei DKGF7 can improve stool consistency in a rat IBS model, which may indicate a potential therapeutic strategy for IBS treatment. Full article
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Review

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Review
Postbiotic Supplementation for Children and Newborn’s Health
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 781; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13030781 - 27 Feb 2021
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Abstract
It is now well known how the microbiota can positively or negatively influence humans health, depending on its composition. The microbiota’s countless beneficial effects have allowed it to be defined as a genuine symbiont for our species. In an attempt to positively influence [...] Read more.
It is now well known how the microbiota can positively or negatively influence humans health, depending on its composition. The microbiota’s countless beneficial effects have allowed it to be defined as a genuine symbiont for our species. In an attempt to positively influence the microbiota, research has focused on probiotics and prebiotics. Probiotics are viable beneficial bacteria of various strains. Prebiotics are specific substances able to favor the development of advantageous bacteria strains. Postbiotics are a new category of compounds capable of affecting the microbiota. According to the different definitions, postbiotics include both nonviable bacteria and substances deriving from bacterial metabolism. Postbiotics are particularly promising in pediatric settings, as they offer some advantages over probiotics, including the absence of the risk of intestinal translocation or worsening of local inflammation. For these reasons, their use in fragile population categories such as newborns, and even more prematures, seems to be the best solution for improving microbiota’s health in this population. This narrative review aims to collect the research conducted so far on postbiotics’ potential in the first stages of life. Full article
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