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Special Issue "Inflammatory Skin Conditions"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Christopher Jackson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sutton Arthritis Research Laboratory, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia
Interests: inflammation; chronic wounds; rheumatoid arthritis; skin; activated protein C; matrix metalloproteinases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The skin, the body’s largest organ, provides a barrier to protect the body from environmental insults including pathogens, maintaining temperature and control evaporation. This barrier is located in the outer layer of the skin known as the epidermis, which sits on the dermis. The epidermis is composed mainly of proliferating keratinocytes in the basal layer which differentiate as they migrate outwards to become lipid-bearing corneocytes. Breaches of this barrier are common events, however, the inability to restore this barrier function can result in health problems such as inflammatory skin conditions which are very common and have high morbidity. This group of diseases includes (in approximate increasing order of severity) : acne, which affects 50% of teenagers; rosacea which affects 10% of adults; atopic dermatitis which affects up to 20% population; psoriasis which affects 2%–3% population; chronic wounds which affect <1% population and the devastating, often fatal, toxic epidermal necrolysis, which is rare. New and innovative drugs that dampen inflammation and restore the defective barrier are required to alleviate these recalcitrant conditions.

This Special Issue calls for original research, mini and full reviews, and perspectives that address the progress and current knowledge in the overlapping research topics of inflammatory skin conditions. These include, but are not limited to the fields that are mentioned in the keywords.

Chris Jackson
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • inflammatory skin conditions
  • chronic wounds
  • psoriasis
  • dermatitis
  • epidermis
  • keratinocytes
  • barrier function
  • inflammatory cells
  • immunity

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Published Papers (30 papers)

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Communication
Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 as a Novel Biomarker for Hair Loss Disorders
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(2), 316; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18020316 - 03 Feb 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3019
Abstract
Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be involved in the inflammatory process via regulating the immune system in many cutaneous disorders, such as psoriasis and rosacea. However, the role of Erdr1 in various hair loss disorders remains unclear. The aim of [...] Read more.
Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be involved in the inflammatory process via regulating the immune system in many cutaneous disorders, such as psoriasis and rosacea. However, the role of Erdr1 in various hair loss disorders remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the putative role of Erdr1 in alopecias. Skin samples from 21 patients with hair loss disorders and five control subjects were retrieved, in order to assess their expression levels of Erdr1. Results revealed that expression of Erdr1 was significantly downregulated in the epidermis and hair follicles of patients with hair loss disorders, when compared to that in the control group. In particular, the expression of Erdr1 was significantly decreased in patients with alopecia areata. We propose that Erdr1 downregulation might be involved in the pathogenesis of hair loss, and could be considered as a novel biomarker for hair loss disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
Extract of Polygala tenuifolia Alleviates Stress-Exacerbated Atopy-Like Skin Dermatitis through the Modulation of Protein Kinase A and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 190; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18010190 - 18 Jan 2017
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3139
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis (AD) and stress create a vicious cycle: stress exacerbates atopic symptoms, and atopic disease elicits stress and anxiety. Targeting multiple pathways including stress and allergic inflammation is, therefore, important for treating AD. In this study, we investigated the remedial value of [...] Read more.
Atopic dermatitis (AD) and stress create a vicious cycle: stress exacerbates atopic symptoms, and atopic disease elicits stress and anxiety. Targeting multiple pathways including stress and allergic inflammation is, therefore, important for treating AD. In this study, we investigated the remedial value of Polygala tenuifolia Willd. (PTW) for treating immobilization (IMO) stress-exacerbated atopy-like skin dermatitis and its underlying mechanism. Trimellitic anhydride (TMA) was applied to dorsal skin for sensitization and subsequently both ears for eliciting T-cell-dependent contact hypersensitivity in mice, which underwent 2 h-IMO stress and PTW administration for the latter 6 and 9 days in the ear exposure period of TMA, respectively. To elicit in vitro degranulation of human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1), 10 µM substance P (SP) and 200 nM corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) were sequentially added with 48 h-interval. PTW extract (500 µg/mL) was added 30 min before CRF treatment. IMO stress exacerbated TMA-induced scratching behavior by 252%, and increased their blood corticosterone levels by two-fold. Treatment with 250 mg/kg PTW significantly restored IMO stress-exacerbated scratching behavior and other indicators such as skin inflammation and water content, lymph node weights, and serum histamine and immunoglobulin E (lgE) levels. Furthermore, it also reversed TMA-stimulated expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-4 mRNAs in ear tissues. PTW significantly inhibited SP/CRF-stimulated degranulation of HMC-1 cells, subsequent tryptase secretion, and protein kinase A (PKA) activity. PTW also selectively inhibited p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation in SP/CRF-treated HMC-1 cells. PTW significantly inhibited HMC-1 cell degranulation and alleviated IMO stress-exacerbated atopic dermatitis symptoms by modulating the PKA/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
Development and Sequential Analysis of a New Multi-Agent, Anti-Acne Formulation Based on Plant-Derived Antimicrobial and Anti-Inflammatory Compounds
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 175; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18010175 - 17 Jan 2017
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3356
Abstract
The antibacterial and anti-inflammatory potential of natural, plant-derived compounds has been reported in many studies. Emerging evidence indicates that plant-derived essential oils and/or their major compounds may represent a plausible alternative treatment for acne, a prevalent skin disorder in both adolescent and adult [...] Read more.
The antibacterial and anti-inflammatory potential of natural, plant-derived compounds has been reported in many studies. Emerging evidence indicates that plant-derived essential oils and/or their major compounds may represent a plausible alternative treatment for acne, a prevalent skin disorder in both adolescent and adult populations. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop and subsequently analyze the antimicrobial activity of a new multi-agent, synergic formulation based on plant-derived antimicrobial compounds (i.e., eugenol, β-pinene, eucalyptol, and limonene) and anti-inflammatory agents for potential use in the topical treatment of acne and other skin infections. The optimal antimicrobial combinations selected in this study were eugenol/β-pinene/salicylic acid and eugenol/β-pinene/2-phenoxyethanol/potassium sorbate. The possible mechanisms of action revealed by flow cytometry were cellular permeabilization and inhibition of efflux pumps activity induced by concentrations corresponding to sub-minimal inhibitory (sub-MIC) values. The most active antimicrobial combination represented by salycilic acid/eugenol/β-pinene/2-phenoxyethanol/potassium sorbate was included in a cream base, which demonstrated thermodynamic stability and optimum microbiological characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
Lifetime Increased Risk of Adult Onset Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Food Allergy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 42; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18010042 - 27 Dec 2016
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3013
Abstract
Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD) causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant [...] Read more.
Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD) causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant AD. However, it is not known whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD, a recently recognized disease entity. Using an initial cohort of one-million subjects, this study retrospectively followed-up 2851 patients with food allergy (age > 12 years) for 14 years and compared them with 11,404 matched controls. While 2.8% (81) of the 2851 food allergy patients developed AD, only 2.0% (227) of the 11,404 controls developed AD. Multivariate regression analysis showed that food allergy patients were more likely to develop AD (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.49, p < 0.0001). Controls had a 1.99% risk of developing AD, while food allergy patients had a significantly higher risk (7.18% and 3.46% for patients with ≥3 and <3 food allergy claims, respectively) of developing adult-onset AD. This is the first study to describe the chronological and dose-dependent associations between food allergy in adolescence and the development of adult-onset AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
Skin Involvement and Pulmonary Hypertension Are Associated with Vitamin D Insufficiency in Scleroderma
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(12), 2103; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17122103 - 14 Dec 2016
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2465
Abstract
Vitamin D status has been linked to immune system and autoimmune disorders; in fact, low levels of vitamin D are common in many autoimmune disorders. The aims of our study were to assess the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and the possible correlation [...] Read more.
Vitamin D status has been linked to immune system and autoimmune disorders; in fact, low levels of vitamin D are common in many autoimmune disorders. The aims of our study were to assess the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and the possible correlation with clinical parameters in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We recruited 40 patients (38 female and two male) with scleroderma and 40 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Demographic and clinical parameters were recorded and the 25-hydroxivitamin D3 serum levels were measured. Serum 25-hydroxivitamin D3 levels were significantly lower in patients with systemic sclerosis than in the control group. The prevalence of 25-hydroxivitamin D3 insufficiency was 50% in the patients and 22.5% in the control group. A statistically significant association was observed between the insufficiency of 25-hydroxivitamin D3 and skin involvement (p = 0.02) and echocardiography systolic pulmonary artery pressure >35 mmHg (p = 0.02). Our data show that the systemic sclerosis group has significantly lower serum 25-hydroxivitamin D3 concentrations compared to the control group; skin involvement and pulmonary hypertension are associated with vitamin D3 insufficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
A Mixture of Extracts of Kochia scoparia and Rosa multiflora with PPAR α/γ Dual Agonistic Effects Prevents Photoaging in Hairless Mice
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1919; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17111919 - 16 Nov 2016
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2835
Abstract
Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) α/γ is known to inhibit the increases in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by ultraviolet light (UV). Extracts of natural herbs, such as Kochia scoparia and Rosa multiflora, have a PPAR α/γ [...] Read more.
Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) α/γ is known to inhibit the increases in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by ultraviolet light (UV). Extracts of natural herbs, such as Kochia scoparia and Rosa multiflora, have a PPAR α/γ dual agonistic effect. Therefore, we investigated whether and how they have an antiaging effect on photoaging skin. Eighteen-week-old hairless mice were irradiated with UVA 14 J/cm2 and UVB 40 mJ/cm2 three times a week for 8 weeks. A mixture of extracts of Kochia scoparia and Rosa multiflora (KR) was topically applied on the dorsal skin of photoaging mice twice a day for 8 weeks. Tesaglitazar, a known PPAR α/γ agonist, and vehicle (propylene glycol:ethanol = 7:3, v/v) were applied as positive and negative controls, respectively. Dermal effects (including dermal thickness, collagen density, dermal expression of procollagen 1 and collagenase 13) and epidermal effects (including skin barrier function, epidermal proliferation, epidermal differentiation, and epidermal cytokines) were measured and compared. In photoaging murine skin, KR resulted in a significant recovery of dermal thickness as well as dermal fibroblasts, although it did not change dermal collagen density. KR increased the expression of dermal transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The dermal effects of KR were explained by an increase in procollagen 1 expression, induced by TGF-β, and a decrease in MMP-13 expression. KR did not affect basal transepidermal water loss (TEWL) or stratum corneum (SC) integrity, but did decrease SC hydration. It also did not affect epidermal proliferation or epidermal differentiation. KR decreased the expression of epidermal interleukin (IL)-1α. Collectively, KR showed possible utility as a therapeutic agent for photoaging skin, with few epidermal side effects such as epidermal hyperplasia or poor differentiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
A Precision Microbiome Approach Using Sucrose for Selective Augmentation of Staphylococcus epidermidis Fermentation against Propionibacterium acnes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1870; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17111870 - 09 Nov 2016
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 5177
Abstract
Acne dysbiosis happens when there is a microbial imbalance of the over-growth of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in the acne microbiome. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis, a probiotic skin bacterium) can exploit [...] Read more.
Acne dysbiosis happens when there is a microbial imbalance of the over-growth of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in the acne microbiome. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis, a probiotic skin bacterium) can exploit glycerol fermentation to produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) which have antimicrobial activities to suppress the growth of P. acnes. Unlike glycerol, sucrose is chosen here as a selective fermentation initiator (SFI) that can specifically intensify the fermentation activity of S. epidermidis, but not P. acnes. A co-culture of P. acnes and fermenting S. epidermidis in the presence of sucrose significantly led to a reduction in the growth of P. acnes. The reduction was abolished when P. acnes was co-cultured with non-fermenting S. epidermidis. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis revealed four SCFAs (acetic acid, butyric acid, lactic acid, and succinic acid) were detectable in the media of S. epidermidis sucrose fermentation. To validate the interference of S. epidermidis sucrose fermentation with P. acnes, mouse ears were injected with both P. acnes and S. epidermidis plus sucrose or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The level of macrophage-inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and the number of P. acnes in ears injected with two bacteria plus sucrose were considerably lower than those in ears injected with two bacteria plus PBS. Our results demonstrate a precision microbiome approach by using sucrose as a SFI for S. epidermidis, holding future potential as a novel modality to equilibrate dysbiotic acne. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
Autoimmunity and Cytokine Imbalance in Inherited Epidermolysis Bullosa
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(10), 1625; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17101625 - 24 Sep 2016
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2507
Abstract
In order to evaluate the serum anti-skin autoantibodies and cytokine concentrations in patients with different epidermolysis bullosa (EB) types and severity, 42 EB patients and 38 controls were enrolled. Serum anti-skin antibodies were significantly higher in the patients than in the controls ( [...] Read more.
In order to evaluate the serum anti-skin autoantibodies and cytokine concentrations in patients with different epidermolysis bullosa (EB) types and severity, 42 EB patients and 38 controls were enrolled. Serum anti-skin antibodies were significantly higher in the patients than in the controls (p = 0.008, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 for desmoglein 1 (DSG1) desmoglein 3 (DSG3), bullous pemphigoid 180 (BP180), BP230 and type VII collagen (COL7), respectively). The same trend was observed for interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-β, and interferon-γ (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.008, p < 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). Increases in anti-skin antibodies and cytokine concentrations were higher in patients with recessive dystrophic EB than in those with different types of EB, in generalized cases than in localized ones, and in patients with higher Birmingham Epidermolysis Bullosa Severity (BEBS) scores than in those with a lower score. The BEBS score was directly correlated with BP180, BP230, COL7 (p = 0.015, p = 0.008 and p < 0.001, respectively) and IL-6 (p = 0.03), whereas IL-6 appeared significantly associated with DSG1, DSG3, BP180, BP230 and COL7 (p = 0.015, p = 0.023, p = 0.023, p = 0.015 and p = 0.005, respectively). This study showed that autoimmunity and inflammatory responses are frequently activated in EB, mainly in severe forms, suggesting the use of immunosuppressive drugs or biologicals that are active against pro-inflammatory cytokines to reduce clinical signs and symptoms of disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
Article
Inflammatory Cutaneous Diseases in Renal Transplant Recipients
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(8), 1362; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17081362 - 19 Aug 2016
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2569
Abstract
Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory [...] Read more.
Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory skin diseases in this type of patient. In this study, we analyze the incidence of a number of inflammatory cutaneous diseases in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation. Although our study shows a relatively low incidence of these pathologies in transplanted patients—in agreement with the general action of immunosuppressant therapies in reducing inflammation—we scored a different efficacy of the various immunosuppressive regimens on inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. This information can be key for designing immunosuppressive regimens and devising accurate follow-up protocols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
Orofacial Manifestations and Temporomandibular Disorders of Systemic Scleroderma: An Observational Study
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(7), 1189; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17071189 - 22 Jul 2016
Cited by 41 | Viewed by 4420
Abstract
Scleroderma is a disorder involving oral and facial tissues, with skin hardening, thin lips, deep wrinkles, xerostomia, tongue rigidity, and microstomia. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of oral manifestations and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) patients [...] Read more.
Scleroderma is a disorder involving oral and facial tissues, with skin hardening, thin lips, deep wrinkles, xerostomia, tongue rigidity, and microstomia. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of oral manifestations and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) patients compared with healthy people. Eighty patients (6 men, 74 women) fulfilling ACR/EULAR SSc Criteria were enrolled. A randomly selected group of 80 patients, matched by sex and age served as control group. The examination for TMD signs and symptoms was based on the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) through a questionnaire and clinical examination. SSc patients complained more frequently (78.8%) of oral symptoms (Xerostomia, dysgeusia, dysphagia and stomatodynia) than controls (28.7%) (χ2 = 40.23 p = 0.001). TMD symptoms (muscle pain on chewing, difficulty in mouth opening, headaches) were complained by 92.5% of SSc patients and by 76.2% of controls (χ2 = 8.012 p = 0.005). At the clinical examination, 85% of SSc patients showed restricted opening versus 20.0% of controls (χ2 = 67.77 p = 0.001), 81.2% of SSc showed reduced right lateral excursion versus 50% of controls (χ2 = 17.316 p = 0.001); 73.8% of SSc showed limited left lateral excursion versus 53.8% of controls (χ2 = 6.924 p = 0.009); and 73.8% of SSc had narrow protrusion versus 56.2% of controls (χ2 = 5.385 p = 0.02). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
Platelet-Rich Plasma-Loaded Poly(d,l-lactide)-Poly(ethylene glycol)-Poly(d,l-lactide) Hydrogel Dressing Promotes Full-Thickness Skin Wound Healing in a Rodent Model
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(7), 1001; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17071001 - 24 Jun 2016
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 3767
Abstract
Traditional therapeutic methods for skin wounds have many disadvantages, and new wound dressings that can facilitate the healing process are thus urgently needed. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains multiple growth factors (GFs) and shows a significant capacity to heal soft tissue wounds. However, these [...] Read more.
Traditional therapeutic methods for skin wounds have many disadvantages, and new wound dressings that can facilitate the healing process are thus urgently needed. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains multiple growth factors (GFs) and shows a significant capacity to heal soft tissue wounds. However, these GFs have a short half-life and deactivate rapidly; we therefore need a sustained delivery system to overcome this shortcoming. In this study, poly(d,l-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA-PEG-PDLLA: PLEL) hydrogel was successfully created as delivery vehicle for PRP GFs and was evaluated systematically. PLEL hydrogel was injectable at room temperature and exhibited a smart thermosensitive in situ gel-formation behavior at body temperature. In vitro cell culture showed PRP-loaded PLEL hydrogel (PRP/PLEL) had little cytotoxicity, and promoted EaHy926 proliferation, migration and tube formation; the factor release assay additionally indicated that PLEL realized the controlled release of PRP GFs for as long as 14 days. When employed to treat rodents’ full-thickness skin defects, PRP/PLEL showed a significantly better ability to raise the number of both newly formed and mature blood vessels compared to the control, PLEL and PRP groups. Furthermore, the PRP/PLEL-treated group displayed faster wound closure, better reepithelialization and collagen formation. Taken together, PRP/PLEL provides a promising strategy for promoting angiogenesis and skin wound healing, which extends the potential of this dressing for clinical application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
Molecular Characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis on the Abdominal Skin of Females before Laparotomy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(6), 992; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17060992 - 22 Jun 2016
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2723
Abstract
Staphylococcus epidermidis, especially methicillin-resistant strains, may be the source of surgical site infections and may be a reservoir of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) for S. aureus. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant [...] Read more.
Staphylococcus epidermidis, especially methicillin-resistant strains, may be the source of surgical site infections and may be a reservoir of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) for S. aureus. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy and determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of these isolates. MRSE was found in 54 of 157 isolates based on mecA gene detection, and there was no difference in icaA gene carriage rate between MRSE and methicillin-susceptible S. epidermidis (MSSE) isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined by broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing according to the latest CLSI manuals. All MRSE isolates had unfavorable antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Twenty-three MRSE strains (42.6%) were multi-drug resistant. SCCmec typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing was performed. Thirty-nine (72.2%) had a single SCCmec type, whereas 1.9% had two types. Fourteen strains (25.9%) were non-typeable (NT). The most frequent MRSE genotype was SCCmec type IVa. High diversity with PFGE patterns was obtained for MRSE, and there were no isolates exhibiting identical pulsotype. The results confirm that methicillin-resistant strains are frequently present among S. epidermidis on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy. Moreover, resistance profiles seem to have no association with the SCCmec types or PFGE types for most common antibiotics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
Pressure Combined with Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Induces Deep Tissue Injury via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in a Rat Pressure Ulcer Model
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(3), 284; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17030284 - 25 Feb 2016
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 3730
Abstract
Pressure ulcer is a complex and significant health problem in long-term bedridden patients, and there is currently no effective treatment or efficient prevention method. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms and pathogenesis contributing to the deep injury of pressure ulcers are unclear. The aim of [...] Read more.
Pressure ulcer is a complex and significant health problem in long-term bedridden patients, and there is currently no effective treatment or efficient prevention method. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms and pathogenesis contributing to the deep injury of pressure ulcers are unclear. The aim of the study was to explore the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and Akt/GSK3β signaling in pressure ulcers. A model of pressure-induced deep tissue injury in adult Sprague-Dawley rats was established. Rats were treated with 2-h compression and subsequent 0.5-h release for various cycles. After recovery, the tissue in the compressed regions was collected for further analysis. The compressed muscle tissues showed clear cellular degenerative features. First, the expression levels of ER stress proteins GRP78, CHOP, and caspase-12 were generally increased compared to those in the control. Phosphorylated Akt and phosphorylated GSK3β were upregulated in the beginning of muscle compression, and immediately significantly decreased at the initiation of ischemia-reperfusion injury in compressed muscles tissue. These data show that ER stress may be involved in the underlying mechanisms of cell degeneration after pressure ulcers and that the Akt/GSK3β signal pathway may play an important role in deep tissue injury induced by pressure and ischemia/reperfusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Article
Therapeutic Effects of Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 on Imiquimod-Induced Psoriasis-Like Skin Inflammation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(2), 244; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17020244 - 17 Feb 2016
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3581
Abstract
Psoriasis is a common skin disease accompanied by chronic inflammation. In previous studies, erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (ERDR1) was shown to have a negative correlation with proinflammatory cytokine IL-18. However, the role of ERDR1 in the inflammatory skin disease psoriasis has not been [...] Read more.
Psoriasis is a common skin disease accompanied by chronic inflammation. In previous studies, erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (ERDR1) was shown to have a negative correlation with proinflammatory cytokine IL-18. However, the role of ERDR1 in the inflammatory skin disease psoriasis has not been evaluated. In this study, to investigate the role of ERDR1 in psoriasis, recombinant ERDR1 was injected intraperitoneally into a psoriasis mouse model. Recombinant ERDR1 (rERDR1) significantly alleviated the symptoms of psoriasis-like skin inflammation and reduced the mRNA of various psoriasis-related markers, including keratin 14, S100A8, and Th17-related cytokines IL-17 and IL-22, suggesting that rERDR1 exerts therapeutic effects on psoriasis via the regulation of Th17 functions. Additionally, the expression of CCL20, a well-known Th17 attracting chemokine, was determined. CCL20 expression significantly decreased in the rERDR1-injected group compared with the vehicle (PBS)-injected group. CCR6 expression in the psoriatic lesional skin was also decreased by rERDR1 administration, implying the inhibition of CCR6-expressing Th17 cell chemotaxis via the downregulation of CCL20. Taken together, this study provides the first evidence that ERDR1 may be a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Communication
Erdr1 Suppresses Murine Melanoma Growth via Regulation of Apoptosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(1), 107; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17010107 - 14 Jan 2016
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3459
Abstract
Melanoma, one of the aggressive cancers, is known to be resistant to chemotherapy. Because of its aggressive nature, effectively inducing apoptosis is necessary to treat melanoma. Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be a stress-related survival factor exhibiting anti-cancer effects in [...] Read more.
Melanoma, one of the aggressive cancers, is known to be resistant to chemotherapy. Because of its aggressive nature, effectively inducing apoptosis is necessary to treat melanoma. Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be a stress-related survival factor exhibiting anti-cancer effects in several cancers. However, little is known about the functions and underlying mechanisms of Erdr1 so far. To demonstrate the effect of Erdr1 in melanoma apoptosis, recombinant murine Erdr1 was injected into mice implanted with B16F10 melanoma cells. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited in mice injected with Erdr1 compared to the control. In addition, the tumor from Erdr1-injected mice showed an increased level of apoptosis. Accordingly, apoptosis-regulating factors including anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic marker Bax in the tumor tissues were examined. As expected, the decreased level of Bcl-2 and increased level of Bax were detected in tumors within the mice injected with Erdr1. Based on the in vivo study, the role of Erdr1 in tumor apoptosis was further tested by incubating it with cells of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10. Erdr1-induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells was observed. Additionally, Erdr1 downregulated STAT3 activity, inhibiting apoptosis via regulation of the Bcl-2 family. Overall, data demonstrate that Erdr1 induced murine melanoma apoptosis through the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax. These findings suggest that Erdr1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in melanoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
The Role of Th-17 Cells and γδ T-Cells in Modulating the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Severe Burn Injury
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 758; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18040758 - 03 Apr 2017
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2869
Abstract
Burns are a global public health problem, accounting for an estimated 265,000 deaths annually. Inflammation is essential in supplying the growth factors, cytokines and chemokines needed to recruit T-cells and myeloid cells to the site of a burn injury for wound healing. However, [...] Read more.
Burns are a global public health problem, accounting for an estimated 265,000 deaths annually. Inflammation is essential in supplying the growth factors, cytokines and chemokines needed to recruit T-cells and myeloid cells to the site of a burn injury for wound healing. However, major burns generate a marked pathophysiological inflammatory response through a widespread release of abundant pro-inflammatory mediators that predispose patients to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis and multi-organ failure. Recently, there has been promising investigation into the role of γδ T-cells and Th-17 cells in the regulation and propagation of this inflammatory response. This study reviews the current literature on the post-burn immune response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars Are the Result of Chronic Inflammation in the Reticular Dermis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(3), 606; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18030606 - 10 Mar 2017
Cited by 226 | Viewed by 20751
Abstract
Keloids and hypertrophic scars are caused by cutaneous injury and irritation, including trauma, insect bite, burn, surgery, vaccination, skin piercing, acne, folliculitis, chicken pox, and herpes zoster infection. Notably, superficial injuries that do not reach the reticular dermis never cause keloidal and hypertrophic [...] Read more.
Keloids and hypertrophic scars are caused by cutaneous injury and irritation, including trauma, insect bite, burn, surgery, vaccination, skin piercing, acne, folliculitis, chicken pox, and herpes zoster infection. Notably, superficial injuries that do not reach the reticular dermis never cause keloidal and hypertrophic scarring. This suggests that these pathological scars are due to injury to this skin layer and the subsequent aberrant wound healing therein. The latter is characterized by continuous and histologically localized inflammation. As a result, the reticular layer of keloids and hypertrophic scars contains inflammatory cells, increased numbers of fibroblasts, newly formed blood vessels, and collagen deposits. Moreover, proinflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are upregulated in keloid tissues, which suggests that, in patients with keloids, proinflammatory genes in the skin are sensitive to trauma. This may promote chronic inflammation, which in turn may cause the invasive growth of keloids. In addition, the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in pathological scars suggests that, rather than being skin tumors, keloids and hypertrophic scars are inflammatory disorders of skin, specifically inflammatory disorders of the reticular dermis. Various external and internal post-wounding stimuli may promote reticular inflammation. The nature of these stimuli most likely shapes the characteristics, quantity, and course of keloids and hypertrophic scars. Specifically, it is likely that the intensity, frequency, and duration of these stimuli determine how quickly the scars appear, the direction and speed of growth, and the intensity of symptoms. These proinflammatory stimuli include a variety of local, systemic, and genetic factors. These observations together suggest that the clinical differences between keloids and hypertrophic scars merely reflect differences in the intensity, frequency, and duration of the inflammation of the reticular dermis. At present, physicians cannot (or at least find it very difficult to) control systemic and genetic risk factors of keloids and hypertrophic scars. However, they can use a number of treatment modalities that all, interestingly, act by reducing inflammation. They include corticosteroid injection/tape/ointment, radiotherapy, cryotherapy, compression therapy, stabilization therapy, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) therapy, and surgical methods that reduce skin tension. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases: Clinical Potential and Mode of Action
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(2), 244; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18020244 - 25 Jan 2017
Cited by 43 | Viewed by 7389
Abstract
Inflammatory skin disorders that cause serious deterioration of the quality of life have become one of the major public concerns. Despite their significance, there is no fundamental cure to date. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess unique immunomodulatory properties which make them a promising [...] Read more.
Inflammatory skin disorders that cause serious deterioration of the quality of life have become one of the major public concerns. Despite their significance, there is no fundamental cure to date. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess unique immunomodulatory properties which make them a promising tool for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. Our recent preclinical and clinical studies have shown that MSCs can be successfully used for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), one of the major inflammatory skin diseases. This observation along with similar reports from other groups revealed the efficacy and underlying mechanisms of MSCs in inflammatory dermatosis. In addition, it has been proposed that cell priming or gene transduction can be novel strategies for the development of next-generation high-efficacy MSCs for treating inflammatory skin diseases. We discuss here existing evidence that demonstrates the regulatory properties of MSCs on immune responses under inflammatory conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
Inflammatory Manifestations of Lymphedema
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 171; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18010171 - 17 Jan 2017
Cited by 54 | Viewed by 3579
Abstract
Lymphedema results from lymphatic insufficiency leading to a progressive inflammatory process that ultimately manifests as discomfort, recurrent infections, and, at times, secondary malignancy. Collectively, these morbidities contribute to an overall poor quality of life. Although there have been recent advances in microsurgical interventions, [...] Read more.
Lymphedema results from lymphatic insufficiency leading to a progressive inflammatory process that ultimately manifests as discomfort, recurrent infections, and, at times, secondary malignancy. Collectively, these morbidities contribute to an overall poor quality of life. Although there have been recent advances in microsurgical interventions, a conservative palliative approach remains the mainstay of treatment for this disabling disease. The absence of a cure is due to an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological changes that result in lymphedema. A histological hallmark of lymphedema is inflammatory cell infiltration and recent studies with animal models and clinical biopsy specimens have suggested that this response plays a key role in the pathology of the disease. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the ongoing research in and the current understanding of the inflammatory manifestations of lymphedema. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
Review of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(12), 2135; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17122135 - 18 Dec 2016
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 7942
Abstract
Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare but life threatening mucocutaneous reaction to drugs or their metabolites. It is characterised by widespread keratinocyte apoptosis and sloughing of the skin, erosions of the mucous membranes, painful blistering, and severe systemic disturbance. The pathophysiology of [...] Read more.
Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare but life threatening mucocutaneous reaction to drugs or their metabolites. It is characterised by widespread keratinocyte apoptosis and sloughing of the skin, erosions of the mucous membranes, painful blistering, and severe systemic disturbance. The pathophysiology of TEN is incompletely understood. Historically, it has been regarded as a drug-induced immune reaction initiated by cytotoxic lymphocytes via a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted pathway. Several mediators have been identified as contributors to the cell death seen in TEN, including; granulysin, soluble Fas ligand, perforin/granzyme, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. Currently, granulysin is accepted as the most important mediator of T cell proliferation. There is uncertainty around the accepted management of TEN. The lack of definitive management guidelines for TEN is explained in part by the rarity of the disease and its high mortality rate, which makes it difficult to conduct randomised control trials on emerging therapies. Developments have been made in pharmacogenomics, with numerous HLA alleles identified; however, these have largely been ethnically specific. These associations have translated into screening recommendations for Han Chinese. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
Inflammation in Chronic Wounds
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(12), 2085; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17122085 - 11 Dec 2016
Cited by 242 | Viewed by 8297
Abstract
Non-healing chronic wounds present a major biological, psychological, social, and financial burden on both individual patients and the broader health system. Pathologically extensive inflammation plays a major role in the disruption of the normal healing cascade. The causes of chronic wounds (venous, arterial, [...] Read more.
Non-healing chronic wounds present a major biological, psychological, social, and financial burden on both individual patients and the broader health system. Pathologically extensive inflammation plays a major role in the disruption of the normal healing cascade. The causes of chronic wounds (venous, arterial, pressure, and diabetic ulcers) can be examined through a juxtaposition of normal healing and the rogue inflammatory response created by the common components within chronic wounds (ageing, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and bacterial colonisation). Wound bed care through debridement, dressings, and antibiotics currently form the basic mode of treatment. Despite recent setbacks, pharmaceutical adjuncts form an interesting area of research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
The Roles of Autophagy and the Inflammasome during Environmental Stress-Triggered Skin Inflammation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(12), 2063; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17122063 - 09 Dec 2016
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 3203
Abstract
Inflammatory skin diseases are the most common problem in dermatology. The induction of skin inflammation by environmental stressors such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and TiO2/ZnO/Ag nanoparticles (NPs) has been demonstrated previously. Recent studies have indicated that the inflammasome [...] Read more.
Inflammatory skin diseases are the most common problem in dermatology. The induction of skin inflammation by environmental stressors such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and TiO2/ZnO/Ag nanoparticles (NPs) has been demonstrated previously. Recent studies have indicated that the inflammasome is often wrongly activated by these environmental irritants, thus inducing massive inflammation and resulting in the development of inflammatory diseases. The regulation of the inflammasome with respect to skin inflammation is complex and is still not completely understood. Autophagy, an intracellular degradation system that is associated with the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, plays a key role in inflammasome inactivation. As a housekeeping pathway, cells utilize autophagy to maintain the homeostasis of the organ structure and function when exposed to environmental stressors. However, only a few studies have examined the effect of autophagy and/or the inflammasome on skin pathogenesis. Here we review recent findings regarding the involvement of autophagy and inflammasome activation during skin inflammation. We posit that autophagy induction is a novel mechanism inter-modulating environmental stressor-induced skin inflammation. We also attempt to highlight the role of the inflammasome and the possible underlying mechanisms and pathways reflecting the pathogenesis of skin inflammation induced by UVR, Cr(VI) and TiO2/ZnO/Ag NPs. A more profound understanding about the crosstalk between autophagy and the inflammasome will contribute to the development of prevention and intervention strategies against human skin disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Roles of Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 (Erdr1) on Inflammatory Skin Diseases
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(12), 2059; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17122059 - 08 Dec 2016
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3023
Abstract
Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known as a hemoglobin synthesis factor which also regulates cell survival under conditions of stress. In addition, previous studies have revealed the effects of Erdr1 on cancer progression and its negative correlation with interleukin (IL)-18, a pro-inflammatory [...] Read more.
Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known as a hemoglobin synthesis factor which also regulates cell survival under conditions of stress. In addition, previous studies have revealed the effects of Erdr1 on cancer progression and its negative correlation with interleukin (IL)-18, a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Based on this evidence, the therapeutic effects of Erdr1 have been demonstrated in several inflammatory skin diseases such as malignant skin cancer, psoriasis, and rosacea. This article reviews the roles of Erdr1 in skin inflammation, suggesting that Erdr1 is a potential therapeutic molecule on inflammatory disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
Rosacea: Molecular Mechanisms and Management of a Chronic Cutaneous Inflammatory Condition
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(9), 1562; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17091562 - 15 Sep 2016
Cited by 67 | Viewed by 5903
Abstract
Rosacea is a chronic cutaneous inflammatory disease that affects the facial skin. Clinically, rosacea can be categorized into papulopustular, erythematotelangiectatic, ocular, and phymatous rosacea. However, the phenotypic presentations of rosacea are more heterogeneous. Although the pathophysiology of rosacea remains to be elucidated, immunologic [...] Read more.
Rosacea is a chronic cutaneous inflammatory disease that affects the facial skin. Clinically, rosacea can be categorized into papulopustular, erythematotelangiectatic, ocular, and phymatous rosacea. However, the phenotypic presentations of rosacea are more heterogeneous. Although the pathophysiology of rosacea remains to be elucidated, immunologic alterations and neurovascular dysregulation are thought to have important roles in initiating and strengthening the clinical manifestations of rosacea. In this article, we present the possible molecular mechanisms of rosacea based on recent laboratory and clinical studies. We describe the genetic predisposition for rosacea along with its associated diseases, triggering factors, and suggested management options in detail based on the underlying molecular biology. Understanding the molecular pathomechanisms of rosacea will likely aid toward better comprehending its complex pathogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
Molecular Mechanisms of Cutaneous Inflammatory Disorder: Atopic Dermatitis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(8), 1234; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17081234 - 30 Jul 2016
Cited by 51 | Viewed by 5232
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease resulting from interactions between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. The pathogenesis of AD is poorly understood, and the treatment of recalcitrant AD is still challenging. There is accumulating evidence for new gene polymorphisms related [...] Read more.
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease resulting from interactions between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. The pathogenesis of AD is poorly understood, and the treatment of recalcitrant AD is still challenging. There is accumulating evidence for new gene polymorphisms related to the epidermal barrier function and innate and adaptive immunity in patients with AD. Newly-found T cells and dendritic cell subsets, cytokines, chemokines and signaling pathways have extended our understanding of the molecular pathomechanism underlying AD. Genetic changes caused by environmental factors have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. We herein present a review of the genetics, epigenetics, barrier dysfunction and immunological abnormalities in AD with a focus on updated molecular biology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis: Pathogenesis, Genetic Background, Clinical Variants and Therapy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(8), 1214; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17081214 - 27 Jul 2016
Cited by 53 | Viewed by 5617
Abstract
Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe, usually drug-related reaction, characterized by an acute onset of mainly small non-follicular pustules on an erythematous base and spontaneous resolution usually within two weeks. Systemic involvement occurs in about 20% of cases. The course is [...] Read more.
Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe, usually drug-related reaction, characterized by an acute onset of mainly small non-follicular pustules on an erythematous base and spontaneous resolution usually within two weeks. Systemic involvement occurs in about 20% of cases. The course is mostly benign, and only in rare cases complications lead to life-threatening situations. Recent studies highlight the importance of genetic variations in interleukin-36 receptor antagonist gene (IL-36RN) in the pathogenesis of this disease. The physiopathology of AGEP remains unclear, but an involvement of innate and acquired immune cells together with resident cells (keratinocytes), which recruit and activate neutrophils via production of cytokines/chemokines such as IL-17, IL-36, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, has been postulated. Treatment is based on the removal of the causative drug, supportive care, infection prevention and use of potent topical or systemic steroids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
Environmental Factors Associated with Altered Gut Microbiota in Children with Eczema: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(7), 1147; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17071147 - 16 Jul 2016
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3398
Abstract
Eczema is a common skin condition that impairs children’s daily life activities and quality of life. Previous research shows that gut microbiome composition plays an important role in the development of eczema. The present review summarizes evidence on environmental factors related to altered [...] Read more.
Eczema is a common skin condition that impairs children’s daily life activities and quality of life. Previous research shows that gut microbiome composition plays an important role in the development of eczema. The present review summarizes evidence on environmental factors related to altered gut microbiota in children with eczema. We searched Medline, PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane database of Systematic Reviews through October 2015. The search strategy focused on articles published in peer-reviewed, English-language journals with no publication year limit. Only original studies and review articles that reported environmental factors on gut microbiome specific to eczema were included in this review. We selected six studies (total 1990 participants) for full review and identified that the composition of gut microbiota specific to eczema could be influenced by the following environmental factors: length of gestation, mode of delivery, type of feeding, method of treatment, number of older siblings, and other lifestyle factors. There has been inconsistent empirical evidence as to the modulatory effects of gut microbiota on immunological functions in children with eczema. Further research on the environmental-host-microbial interaction is needed to develop a strong base of knowledge for the development and implementation of prevention strategies and policies for eczema. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
Cytoskeletal Regulation of Inflammation and Its Impact on Skin Blistering Disease Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(7), 1116; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms17071116 - 13 Jul 2016
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3531
Abstract
Actin remodelling proteins regulate cytoskeletal cell responses and are important in both innate and adaptive immunity. These responses play a major role in providing a fine balance in a cascade of biological events that results in either protective acute inflammation or chronic inflammation [...] Read more.
Actin remodelling proteins regulate cytoskeletal cell responses and are important in both innate and adaptive immunity. These responses play a major role in providing a fine balance in a cascade of biological events that results in either protective acute inflammation or chronic inflammation that leads to a host of diseases including autoimmune inflammation mediated epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). This review describes the role of the actin cytoskeleton and in particular the actin remodelling protein called Flightless I (Flii) in regulating cellular inflammatory responses and its subsequent effect on the autoimmune skin blistering disease EBA. It also outlines the potential of an antibody based therapy for decreasing Flii expression in vivo to ameliorate the symptoms associated with EBA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Review
IL-18 and Cutaneous Inflammatory Diseases
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16(12), 29357-29369; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms161226172 - 09 Dec 2015
Cited by 41 | Viewed by 4283
Abstract
Interleukin (IL)-18, an IL-1 family cytokine, is a pleiotropic immune regulator. IL-18 plays a strong proinflammatory role by inducing interferon (IFN)-γ. Previous studies have implicated IL-18 in the pathogenesis of various diseases. However, it is not well understood biologic activities of IL-18 in [...] Read more.
Interleukin (IL)-18, an IL-1 family cytokine, is a pleiotropic immune regulator. IL-18 plays a strong proinflammatory role by inducing interferon (IFN)-γ. Previous studies have implicated IL-18 in the pathogenesis of various diseases. However, it is not well understood biologic activities of IL-18 in the diverse skin diseases. Here, we have reviewed the expression and function of IL-18 in skin diseases including inflammatory diseases. This article provides an evidence-based understanding of the role of IL-18 in skin diseases and its relationship with disease activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Commentary
Testing Human Skin and Respiratory Sensitizers—What Is Good Enough?
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(2), 241; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18020241 - 24 Jan 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2051
Abstract
Alternative methods for accurate in vitro assessment of skin and respiratory sensitizers are urgently needed. Sensitization is a complex biological process that cannot be evaluated accurately using single events or biomarkers, since the information content is too restricted in these measurements. On the [...] Read more.
Alternative methods for accurate in vitro assessment of skin and respiratory sensitizers are urgently needed. Sensitization is a complex biological process that cannot be evaluated accurately using single events or biomarkers, since the information content is too restricted in these measurements. On the contrary, if the tremendous information content harbored in DNA/mRNA could be mined, most complex biological processes could be elucidated. Genomic technologies available today, including transcriptional profiling and next generation sequencing, have the power to decipher sensitization, when used in the right context. Thus, a genomic test platform has been developed, denoted the Genomic Allergen Rapid Detection (GARD) assay. Due to the high informational content of the GARD test, accurate predictions of both the skin and respiratory sensitizing capacity of chemicals, have been demonstrated. Based on a matured dendritic cell line, acting as a human-like reporter system, information about potency has also been acquired. Consequently, multiparametric diagnostic technologies are disruptive test principles that can change the way in which the next generation of alternative methods are designed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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