Special Issue "Antioxidant Intake in Older Adults and Elderly People"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Josep A. Tur
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress (NUCOX), University of the Balearic Islands & CIBEROBN (Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition), and Foundation of Health Research Institute of the Balearic Islands (IdISBa), Campus UIB, Guillem Colom Bldg., 07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Interests: human nutrition; obesity; clinical trials; adults; children
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Antoni Sureda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress (NUCOX), University of the Balearic Islands & CIBEROBN (Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition), and Foundation of Health Research Institute of the Balearic Islands (IdISBa). Campus UIB, Guillem Colom Bldg., 07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Interests: community nutrition; mediterranean diet; public health; diet; nutrition; sports nutrition; obesity; non-alcoholic fatty liver; oxidative stress; antioxidants; inflammation; ecotoxicology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Demographic changes in Europe have associated benefits and challenges, as older generation have specific needs to sustain their own, independent lifestyles. However, the older organism loses its ability to produce certain substances by itself, like endogenous antioxidants. Then, within the context of healthy ageing, nutrition plays a crucial role, since it must give enough antioxidant to counterbalance the endogenous production of oxidant species. A comprehensive knowledge of the impact of redox active nutritional and physiological components on the ageing and aged human body is therefore urgently required by means of a multidisciplinary approach. On this topic, you are invited to submit proposals for manuscripts that fit the objectives and the topics of this Special issue.

The aim of this proposed Special Issue, on "Antioxidant Intake in Older Adults and Elderly People" is to publish selected papers detailing specific aspects of nutrition that could play a role in antioxidant intake enough to cover genesis of oxidative species in the older organism, and then to prevent oxidative stress and associated dysfunctions.

Prof. Dr. Josep A. Tur
Dr. Antoni Sureda
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Oxidative stress
  • Antioxidant
  • Pro-oxidant
  • Redox
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Reactive nitrogen species
  • Food habits
  • Older adults
  • Elderly people

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Antioxidant Adaptations to Regular Physical Activity in Elderly People
Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1555; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu10101555 - 20 Oct 2018
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1904
Abstract
Regular physical activity prescription is a key point for healthy aging and chronic disease management and prevention. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant defense system and the mitochondrial status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and the level of oxidative damage in [...] Read more.
Regular physical activity prescription is a key point for healthy aging and chronic disease management and prevention. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant defense system and the mitochondrial status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and the level of oxidative damage in plasma in active, intermediate and inactive elderly. In total, 127 healthy men and women >55 years old participated in the study and were classified according on their level of declared physical activity. A more active lifestyle was accompanied by lower weight, fat mass and body mass index when compared to a more sedentary life-style. Active participants exhibited lower circulating PBMCs than inactive peers. Participants who reported higher levels of exercise had increased antioxidant protein levels when compared to more sedentary partakers. Carbonylated protein levels exhibited similar behavior, accompanied by a significant raise in expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV in PBMCs. No significant changes were found in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and in the expression of structural (MitND5) and mitochondrial dynamic-related (PGC1α and Mitofusins1/2.) proteins. Active lifestyle and daily activities exert beneficial effects on body composition and it enhances the antioxidant defenses and oxidative metabolism capabilities in PBMCs from healthy elderly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Intake in Older Adults and Elderly People)
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Article
Are Total and Individual Dietary Lignans Related to Cardiovascular Disease and Its Risk Factors in Postmenopausal Women? A Nationwide Study
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 865; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu10070865 - 04 Jul 2018
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2405
Abstract
The study objectives were to examine total and individual lignan intakes and their dietary sources in postmenopausal Polish women and to investigate the relationship between lignan intake and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and central obesity. A total of 2599 [...] Read more.
The study objectives were to examine total and individual lignan intakes and their dietary sources in postmenopausal Polish women and to investigate the relationship between lignan intake and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and central obesity. A total of 2599 postmenopausal women, participants of the Multi-centre National Population Health Examination Surveys (WOBASZ and WOBASZ II) were selected. Of them, 916 had a history of CVD. Nutritional data were collected using a single 24-h dietary recall. Data on lignan content in food, i.e., lariciresinol (LARI), matairesinol (MAT), pinoresinol (PINO) and secoisolariciresinol (SECO), were collected from the available lignan databases. In postmenopausal women, total and individual lignan intakes (SECO, PINO, MAT) were not associated with the prevalence of CVD and its risk factors. The intake of LARI was linked by 30% to the reduced odds for hypercholestrolemia. This study reinforces the existing concept that dietary total lignans are not associated with the prevalence of CVD, and provides further evidence that they are not linked to CVD risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and central obesity. However, the intake of LARI should be taken into consideration in further studies with regard to its potentially beneficial effect in hypercholesterolemia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Intake in Older Adults and Elderly People)
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Article
Whey Protein Concentrate WPC-80 Improves Antioxidant Defense Systems in the Salivary Glands of 14-Month Wistar Rats
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 782; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu10060782 - 17 Jun 2018
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2321
Abstract
Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is characterized by powerful antioxidant properties, but its effect on redox homeostasis of salivary glands of aging organisms is still unknown. In this study, we are the first to evaluate the antioxidant barrier of salivary glands of 14-month Wistar [...] Read more.
Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is characterized by powerful antioxidant properties, but its effect on redox homeostasis of salivary glands of aging organisms is still unknown. In this study, we are the first to evaluate the antioxidant barrier of salivary glands of 14-month Wistar rats fed WPC-80. Total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) as well as concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) are estimated in the submandibular and parotid glands of rats administered WPC-80 intragastrically for a period of 7 and 14 days. We demonstrate a significant increase in GSH, GPx and SOD in the salivary glands of rats fed WPC-80 for 14 days and a significant increase in TAS, GPx and SOD in the parotid glands of rats fed WPC-80 for 7 days compared to control rats. The beneficial effects of WPC-80 on salivary glands are also demonstrated by lower TOS and OSI in the parotid glands of rats fed WPC-80 compared to the submandibular glands. In summary, we demonstrate that WPC-80 improves redox homeostasis in salivary glands, particularly in the parotid glands of old rats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Intake in Older Adults and Elderly People)
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Review

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Review
Oxidative Stress and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 872; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11040872 - 18 Apr 2019
Cited by 69 | Viewed by 5433
Abstract
Aging is a complex phenomenon characterized by the progressive loss of tissue and organ function. The oxidative-stress theory of aging postulates that age-associated functional losses are due to the accumulation of ROS-induced damage. Liver function impairment and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are [...] Read more.
Aging is a complex phenomenon characterized by the progressive loss of tissue and organ function. The oxidative-stress theory of aging postulates that age-associated functional losses are due to the accumulation of ROS-induced damage. Liver function impairment and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are common among the elderly. NAFLD can progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and evolve to hepatic cirrhosis or hepatic carcinoma. Oxidative stress, lipotoxicity, and inflammation play a key role in the progression of NAFLD. A growing body of evidence supports the therapeutic potential of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), mainly docosahaexenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), on metabolic diseases based on their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we performed a systematic review of clinical trials analyzing the efficacy of n-3 PUFA on both systemic oxidative stress and on NAFLD/NASH features in adults. As a matter of fact, it remains controversial whether n-3 PUFA are effective to counteract oxidative stress. On the other hand, data suggest that n-3 PUFA supplementation may be effective in the early stages of NAFLD, but not in patients with more severe NAFLD or NASH. Future perspectives and relevant aspects that should be considered when planning new randomized controlled trials are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Intake in Older Adults and Elderly People)
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Review
Dietary Polyphenols Targeting Arterial Stiffness: Interplay of Contributing Mechanisms and Gut Microbiome-Related Metabolism
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 578; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu11030578 - 08 Mar 2019
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3375
Abstract
Increased arterial stiffness is a degenerative vascular process, progressing with age that leads to a reduced capability of arteries to expand and contract in response to pressure changes. This progressive degeneration mainly affects the extracellular matrix of elastic arteries and causes loss of [...] Read more.
Increased arterial stiffness is a degenerative vascular process, progressing with age that leads to a reduced capability of arteries to expand and contract in response to pressure changes. This progressive degeneration mainly affects the extracellular matrix of elastic arteries and causes loss of vascular elasticity. Recent studies point to significant interference of dietary polyphenols with mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology and progression of arterial stiffness. This review summarizes data from epidemiological and interventional studies on the effect of polyphenols on vascular stiffness as an illustration of current research and addresses possible etiological factors targeted by polyphenols, including pathways of vascular functionality, oxidative status, inflammation, glycation, and autophagy. Effects can either be inflicted directly by the dietary polyphenols or indirectly by metabolites originated from the host or microbial metabolic processes. The composition of the gut microbiome, therefore, determines the resulting metabolome and, as a consequence, the observed activity. On the other hand, polyphenols also influence the intestinal microbial composition, and therefore the metabolites available for interaction with relevant targets. As such, targeting the gut microbiome is another potential treatment option for arterial stiffness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Intake in Older Adults and Elderly People)
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