Special Issue "Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Begoña Muguerza
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Guest Editor
Nutrigenomics Research Group, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona, Spain
Interests: bioactive peptides; phenolic compounds; HPLC-MS; hypertension; metabolic syndrome; nutrigenomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Francisca Isabel Bravo
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Nutrigenomics Research Group, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona, Spain
Interests: phitochemicals; bioactive peptides; bioactive compounds characterization; antihypertensive activity; molecular biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, the leading cause of death worldwide is cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hypertension is one of their major risk factors, suffered by one in four adults. Therefore, the reduction of its prevalence is one of the global targets to be attained. Phytochemicals present in food and agri-food by-products such as phenolic compounds and bioactive peptides have shown to be effective for controlling blood pressure and, improving CVD. These antihypertensive compounds obtained from natural sources have emerged as an excellent alternative to synthetic drugs, and are highly demanded, and searched.

The aim of this special issue is to collect original research manuscripts, meta-analysis and reviews dealing with the beneficial effect of bioactive compounds on hypertension. We invite clinicians and researchers to submit relevant scientific work to this Special Issue. Original research manuscripts, both using human and animal models, focused on the search and evaluation of antihypertensive compounds from diets, as well as original products, extracts, and single molecules from plants, food and agri-food by-products will be considered. Moreover, the in vitro or in vivo studies to elucidate the involved mechanisms in the antihypertensive effect of different bioactive compounds will be also welcomed.

Dr. Begoña Muguerza
Dr. Francisca Isabel Bravo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hypertension
  • Antihypertensive
  • Bioactive peptides
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Phytochemicals
  • Antioxidants
  • ACE inhibition
  • Endothelial function
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Metabolic syndrome

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Coffee Consumption and Blood Pressure: Results of the Second Wave of the Cognition of Older People, Education, Recreational Activities, Nutrition, Comorbidities, and Functional Capacity Studies (COPERNICUS)
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3372; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13103372 - 25 Sep 2021
Viewed by 586
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between the frequency of coffee consumption and blood pressure over a two year follow up of a cohort of elderly people. Healthy, older people (N = 205) were examined at baseline and at two years. Participants completed physical [...] Read more.
This study examined the relationship between the frequency of coffee consumption and blood pressure over a two year follow up of a cohort of elderly people. Healthy, older people (N = 205) were examined at baseline and at two years. Participants completed physical and behavioural assessments, which included body composition, current pharmacological treatment, and frequency of coffee consumption grouped into three categories: “never to a few times per month”, “once a week to a few times per week”, and “every day”. Blood pressure (systolic (sBP), diastolic (dBP), mean (mBP), and pulse pressure (PP)) was measured at baseline and after two years. After adjusting for body composition, smoking status, age, sex, heart rate, and number of antihypertensive agents taken, participants who drank coffee everyday had a significant increase in sBP, with a mean of 8.63 (1.27; 15.77) and an mBP, with a mean of 5.55 mmHg (0.52; 10.37) after two years (t = 2.37, p = 0.02 and t = 2.17, p = 0.03, respectively) compared to participants who never or very rarely (up to a few times per month) drank coffee. DBP and PP were not affected by coffee consumption frequency in a statistically significant manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
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Article
Administration with Quinoa Protein Reduces the Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats and Modifies the Fecal Microbiota
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2446; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13072446 - 17 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 775
Abstract
Despite the well-established role of quinoa protein as the source of antihypertensive peptides through in vitro enzymolysis, there is little evidence supporting the in vivo antihypertensive effect of intact quinoa protein. In this study, in vivo study on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) was [...] Read more.
Despite the well-established role of quinoa protein as the source of antihypertensive peptides through in vitro enzymolysis, there is little evidence supporting the in vivo antihypertensive effect of intact quinoa protein. In this study, in vivo study on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) was conducted by administering quinoa protein for five weeks. Gastrointestinal content identification indicated that many promising precursors of bioactive peptides were released from quinoa protein under gastrointestinal processing. Quinoa protein administration on SHRs resulted in a significant decrease in blood pressure, a significant increase in alpha diversity, and microbial structure alternation towards that in non-hypertension rats. Furthermore, blood pressure was highly negatively correlated with the elevated abundance of genera in quinoa protein-treated SHRs, such as Turicibacter and Allobaculum. Interestingly, the fecal microbiota in quinoa protein-treated SHRs shared more features in the composition of genera with non-hypertension rats than that of the captopril-treated group. These results indicate that quinoa protein may serve as a potential candidate to lower blood pressure and ameliorate hypertension-related gut dysbiosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
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Article
Blood Pressure-Lowering Effect of Wine Lees: Dose-Response Study, Effect of Dealcoholization and Possible Mechanisms of Action
Nutrients 2021, 13(4), 1142; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13041142 - 30 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1231
Abstract
The antihypertensive effect of wine lees (WL) has been previously evidenced. In this study, the antihypertensive properties of different doses of WL were evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In addition, the blood pressure (BP)-lowering effect of dried (dealcoholized) WL powder (WLPW) and [...] Read more.
The antihypertensive effect of wine lees (WL) has been previously evidenced. In this study, the antihypertensive properties of different doses of WL were evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In addition, the blood pressure (BP)-lowering effect of dried (dealcoholized) WL powder (WLPW) and the mechanisms involved in its functionality were investigated. Furthermore, a possible hypotensive effect of WLPW was discarded in Wistar–Kyoto (WKY) rats. The administration of WL at different doses caused a dose-dependent decrease in BP of SHR up to 5.0 mL/kg bw, exhibiting the maximum decrease at 6 h post-administration. WLPW caused a greater drop in BP than WL, showing an antihypertensive effect higher and more prolonged than the drug Captopril. Moreover, the BP-lowering effect of WLPW was specific to the hypertensive state since an undesirable hypotensive effect in normotensive WKY rats was ruled out. Finally, WLPW improved oxidative stress and increased the activity of the antioxidant endogen system of SHR. These results suggest that WLPW could be used as functional ingredient for foods or nutraceuticals to ameliorate hypertension. Nevertheless, further clinical studies are needed to evaluate its long-term antihypertensive efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
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