Special Issue "Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity of Plant Extracts"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant-Derived Antibiotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Marco Guida
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Naples, Naples, Italy
Interests: biofilms; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Candida spp.; food safety; foodborne pathogenic bacteria; clinical devices; natural compounds; quorum sensing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Valeria Di Onofrio
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Sciences and Technologies, University of Naples “Parthenope”, Naples, Italy
Interests: biofilms; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Candida spp.; food safety; foodborne pathogenic bacteria; clinical devices; natural compounds; quorum sensing
Dr. Emilia Galdiero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy
Interests: biofilms; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Candida spp.; food safety; foodborne pathogenic bacteria; clinical devices; natural compounds; quorum sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the spread of antibiotic resistance in the hospital environment and in communities where biofilms are involved has stimulated the development of innovative strategies that can solve this problem. Due to the slow spread of antibiotics through the biofilm matrix, the presence of biofilms represents a challenging eradication issue compared to planktonic.

The importance of polymicrobial infections caused by a mixture of bacteria and fungi is increasingly recognized in medical settings and their complexity represents an additional challenge to find an efficient treatment strategy.

Antibiotic abuse has led to increased clinical resistance of microorganisms and the occurrence of uncommon infections; many infections are caused by microorganisms that resist response to conventional treatment. It is necessary to develop new antimicrobial agents that can inhibit the formation of or destroy mature biofilms, increasing the susceptibility of microbes to antibiotics.

There is a growing interest in the use of compounds derived from medicinal plants as alternative antimicrobial agents.

These natural compounds can be used in some clinical procedures, but also in the food industry. Some of these compounds are essential oils or specific compounds directly derived from different plants, fruit, and/or spices as well as new compounds that are discovered regularly.

Prof. Marco Guida
Dr. Valeria Di Onofrio
Dr. Emilia Galdiero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural antimicrobial compounds
  • Antimicrobial effects
  • Antibiofilm effects
  • Clinical applications
  • Food applications
  • Combination with other antimicrobials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Back to Nature: Combating Candida albicans Biofilm, Phospholipase and Hemolysin Using Plant Essential Oils
Antibiotics 2021, 10(1), 81; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10010081 - 15 Jan 2021
Viewed by 685
Abstract
Candida albicans is the causative agent of fatal systemic candidiasis. Due to limitations of antifungals, new drugs are needed. The anti-virulence effect of plant essential oils (EOs) was evaluated against clinical C. albicans isolates including cinnamon, clove, jasmine and rosemary oils. Biofilm, phospholipase [...] Read more.
Candida albicans is the causative agent of fatal systemic candidiasis. Due to limitations of antifungals, new drugs are needed. The anti-virulence effect of plant essential oils (EOs) was evaluated against clinical C. albicans isolates including cinnamon, clove, jasmine and rosemary oils. Biofilm, phospholipase and hemolysin were assessed phenotypically. EOs were evaluated for their anti-virulence activity using phenotypic methods as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Among the C. albicans isolates, biofilm, phospholipase and hemolysins were detected in 40.4, 86.5 and 78.8% of isolates, respectively. Jasmine oil showed the highest anti-biofilm activity followed by cinnamon, clove and rosemary oils. SEM and AFM analysis showed reduced adherence and roughness in the presence of EOs. For phospholipase, rosemary oil was the most inhibitory, followed by jasmine, cinnamon and clove oils, and for hemolysins, cinnamon had the highest inhibition followed by jasmine, rosemary and clove oils. A molecular docking study revealed major EO constituents as promising inhibitors of the Als3 adhesive protein, with the highest binding for eugenol, followed by 1,8-cineole, 2-phenylthiolane and cinnamaldehyde. In conclusion, EOs have a promising inhibitory impact on Candida biofilm, phospholipase and hemolysin production, hence EOs could be used as potential antifungals that impact virulence factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity of Plant Extracts)
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Article
Antimicrobial and Antivirulence Impacts of Phenolics on Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium
Antibiotics 2020, 9(10), 668; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9100668 - 03 Oct 2020
Viewed by 733
Abstract
Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) remains a major infectious agent in the USA, with an increasing antibiotic resistance pattern, which requires the development of novel antimicrobials capable of controlling ST. Polyphenolic compounds found in plant extracts are strong candidates as alternative antimicrobials, particularly [...] Read more.
Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) remains a major infectious agent in the USA, with an increasing antibiotic resistance pattern, which requires the development of novel antimicrobials capable of controlling ST. Polyphenolic compounds found in plant extracts are strong candidates as alternative antimicrobials, particularly phenolic acids such as gallic acid (GA), protocatechuic acid (PA) and vanillic acid (VA). This study evaluates the effectiveness of these compounds in inhibiting ST growth while determining changes to the outer membrane through fluorescent dye uptake and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), in addition to measuring alterations to virulence genes with qRT-PCR. Results showed antimicrobial potential for all compounds, significantly inhibiting the detectable growth of ST. Fluorescent spectrophotometry and microscopy detected an increase in relative fluorescent intensity (RFI) and red-colored bacteria over time, suggesting membrane permeabilization. SEM revealed severe morphological defects at the polar ends of bacteria treated with GA and PA, while VA-treated bacteria were found to be mid-division. Relative gene expression showed significant downregulation in master regulator hilA and invH after GA and PA treatments, while fliC was upregulated in VA. Results suggest that GA, PA and VA have antimicrobial potential that warrants further research into their mechanism of action and the interactions that lead to ST death. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity of Plant Extracts)
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Article
Biological Activities of Essential Oils from Leaves of Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum and Limnocitrus littoralis (Miq.) Swingle
Antibiotics 2020, 9(4), 207; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9040207 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 1232
Abstract
The present study aimed to determine the bioactivities of essential oils extracted from the leaves of Paramignya trimera and Limnocitrus littoralis, including cytotoxicity, antiviral, antibacterial, antimycotic, and antitrichomonas effects. Herein, it was indicated that P. trimera and L. littoralis oils showed no [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to determine the bioactivities of essential oils extracted from the leaves of Paramignya trimera and Limnocitrus littoralis, including cytotoxicity, antiviral, antibacterial, antimycotic, and antitrichomonas effects. Herein, it was indicated that P. trimera and L. littoralis oils showed no cytotoxicity on normal cells, namely MT-4, BHK-21, MDBK, and Vero-76. P. trimera oil (i) exhibited the strongest inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus with MIC and MLC values of 2% (v/v); (ii) showed MIC and MLC values of 8% (v/v) in Candida parapsilosis; and (iii) in the remaining strains, showed MIC and MLC values greater than or equal to 16% (v/v). On the other hand, L. littoralis oil (i) displayed the strongest inhibition against Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilosis with 2% (v/v) of MIC and MLC; and (ii) in the remaining strains, possessed MIC and MLC greater than or equal to 16% (v/v). In addition, antitrichomonas activities of the oils were undertaken, showing IC50, IC90, MLC values, respectively, at 0.016%, 0.03%, and 0.06% (v/v) from P. trimera, and 0.03%, 0.06%, 0.12% (v/v) from L. littoralis, after 48 h of incubation. The oils were completely ineffective against ssRNA+ (HIV-1, YFV, BVDV, Sb-1, CV-B4), ssRNA- (RSV, VSV), dsRNA (Reo-1), and dsDNA (HSV-1, VV) viruses. This is the first report describing the cytotoxicity, antiviral, antibacterial, antimycotic, and antitrichomonas activities of the essential oils of P. trimera and L. littoralis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity of Plant Extracts)
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