Special Issue "Implications of Nutrition Education for Health, Behavior and Lifestyle"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Policies and Education for Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Antonis Zampelas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, 157 72 Athens, Greece
Interests: human nutrition; cardiovascular nutrition; nutritional epidemiology; obesity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. George Moschonis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne 3086, Australia
Interests: nutritional epidemiology; nutritional assessment; nutritional counselling; functional foods
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Emmanuella Magriplis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: nutritional epidemiology; nutrition education; public health nutrition; nutrition and chronic diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to the World Health Organization, nutrition is defined as “the intake of food in relation to the body’s dietary needs”. Malnutrition is an umbrella term used for over- and under-nutrition to reflect macronutrient intake, but recently the term “hidden hunger” has emerged to underline the importance of micronutrients in the diet. An adequate, well-balanced diet is a cornerstone of good health, has a great impact on wellbeing, and is reflected by dietary intake and behavior. Diet and behavior are highly modifiable factors that can help to prevent the emergence of new cases or ameliorate their progression. Nutrition education represents the main means for training individuals and groups on the principles of good nutrition, based on their needs, making nutrition information digestible and usable in everyday life.

Currently, a wide discrepancy exists in nutrition-related advice that originates from a wide range of different sources, many of which are unreliable and scientifically invalid, further underlining the need for fitting nutrition education.

Although health professionals play a different role in educating an individual in the clinic, the community, or a long-term healthcare facility, nutrition education is not fully integrated in the training programs of most healthcare professions. This partly explains the public’s considerable confusion on what is correct nutritional advice, which is exacerbated by the discrepancy.

The aim of this Special Issue is to publish original research articles and systematic reviews that report the design and implementation of nutrition education intervention programs and their effectiveness in terms of lifestyle, health, and wellbeing. More specifically, this Special Issue aims to bring together a selection of original research articles and reviews that showcase the latest evidence on the design of nutrition education programs that target individuals or groups at different life stages and of different health statuses and their effectiveness in promoting sustainable changes in diet, lifestyle, health, and wellbeing.

We welcome the submission of design and intervention studies as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses from a wide range of related disciplines (e.g., human nutrition and dietetics, public health, epidemiology, health promotion, and non-communicable chronic diseases).

Prof. Dr. Antonis Zampelas
Dr. George Moschonis
Dr. Emmanuella Magriplis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutrition education
  • dietary behavior
  • dietary intervention
  • healthy eating
  • behavioral changes
  • lifestyle
  • health
  • wellbeing
  • prevention of chronic diseases

Published Papers (14 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Feasibility Study of a Newly Developed Technology-Mediated Lifestyle Intervention for Overweight and Obese Young Adults
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2547; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082547 - 26 Jul 2021
Viewed by 630
Abstract
Background: Poor eating habits and sedentary lifestyle are common among young adults and increase the risk for chronic diseases later in life. Due to the widespread use of information technology among young adults, the Rashakaty (Fitness for Me) study aimed to develop and [...] Read more.
Background: Poor eating habits and sedentary lifestyle are common among young adults and increase the risk for chronic diseases later in life. Due to the widespread use of information technology among young adults, the Rashakaty (Fitness for Me) study aimed to develop and test the feasibility of a technology-based nutrition education intervention. This would support overweight and obese university students to achieve weight loss, enhance nutrition knowledge, and increase physical activity levels. Methods: We enrolled 246 participants in a 16-week non-randomized feasibility study with two arms: Rashakaty-Basic and Rashakaty-Enhanced. The intervention was guided by social cognitive theory and was delivered via a website and mobile apps. Results: Among the 161 participants who completed the endline assessments, there was no significant difference in weight loss between the two arms. However, waist circumference decreased more (p = 0.003) in the Rashakaty -Enhanced group. Additionally, changes in knowledge related to sources of nutrients (p < 0.001) and diet–disease relationships (p = 0.006) were significantly higher among the Rashakaty-Enhanced group. Rashakaty-Enhanced participants reported increased number of days spent on moderate physical activity (p = 0.013) and minutes walked (p < 0.001). Moreover, they also reported higher scores in social support from friends to reduce fat intake (p = 0.006) and from family and friends to increase physical activity (p = 0.001). Conclusions: The results of this feasibility study can assist in the development and implementation of future technology–mediated health promotion programs in the UAE, especially for young adults. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Contextually Appropriate Tools and Solutions to Facilitate Healthy Eating Identified by People with Type 2 Diabetes
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2301; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13072301 - 03 Jul 2021
Viewed by 904
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex, multifaceted disease and its treatment involves lifestyle intervention (LI) programs that participants may find difficult to adopt and maintain. The objective of this study is to understand the lived experiences of participants with T2D regarding healthy [...] Read more.
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex, multifaceted disease and its treatment involves lifestyle intervention (LI) programs that participants may find difficult to adopt and maintain. The objective of this study is to understand the lived experiences of participants with T2D regarding healthy eating behavior change, in order to identify and incorporate relevant information, skills, and educational approaches into LI programs. An explorative qualitative study was undertaken. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit 15 participants. One-on-one, semi-structured, open-ended, and in-depth interviews were conducted. An essentialist paradigm was adopted to accurately report the experiences, meaning, and reality of participants. An inductive approach was used to analyze the data. Participants reported that being diagnosed and living with T2D could be overwhelming, and their ability to manage was influenced by health care providers (HCP), family, and individual context. Many experienced a loop of “good–bad” eating behaviors. Participants expressed desires for future diabetes management that would include program content (nutrition, physical activity, mental health, foot care, and consequences of T2D), program features (understand context, explicit information, individualized, hands-on learning, applicable, realistic, incremental, and practical), program components (access to multidisciplinary team, set goals, track progress and be held accountable, one-on-one sessions, group support, maintenance/follow-up), and policy change. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that T2D management requires more extensive, comprehensive, and ongoing support, guided by the individual participant. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Applying the Stages of Change Model in a Nutrition Education Programme for the Promotion of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among People with Severe Mental Disorders (DIETMENT)
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 2105; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13062105 - 19 Jun 2021
Viewed by 780
Abstract
Despite growing evidence of the benefits of adequate intake of fruit and vegetables (F&V) and the recommendation to consume five servings daily, the adoption of these habits is poor among people with severe mental disorder (SMD). The main aim of the present study [...] Read more.
Despite growing evidence of the benefits of adequate intake of fruit and vegetables (F&V) and the recommendation to consume five servings daily, the adoption of these habits is poor among people with severe mental disorder (SMD). The main aim of the present study is to determine changes in the intake of F&V and motivation to do so among people with SMDs after participating in a food education programme. A community-based randomized controlled trial was conducted in Spain, with the intervention group (IG) participating in a food education programme based on the stages of change model to promote consumption of F&V and the control group (CG) receiving three informative sessions on basic healthy eating. The main outcomes were related to the intake of F&V and stages of change. Data collection was performed at baseline, post intervention, and 12-month follow-up. Seventy-four participants enrolled in the study and sixty completed the 12-month follow-up. An increase in motivation towards the intake of F&V was observed in the IG but not in the CG (McNemar’s test p = 0.016, p = 0.625). No significant difference was observed for the intake of fruit, vegetables, or F&V. Basing food education strategies on the stages of change model shows positive results, increasing the awareness and disposition of people with SMD towards the intake of F&V. More research is needed to identify the most appropriate eating intervention to increase the intake of F&V. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Currents Nutritional Practices of Nutritionists in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Patients at Public Health Centres in Padang, Indonesia
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1975; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13061975 - 08 Jun 2021
Viewed by 882
Abstract
(1) Background: The interest in nutrition practices and education is slowly gaining traction among Indonesian nutritionists. However, there is a lack of local studies that evaluate nutritional practices, especially in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). This cross-sectional study aimed to determine [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The interest in nutrition practices and education is slowly gaining traction among Indonesian nutritionists. However, there is a lack of local studies that evaluate nutritional practices, especially in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the nutritional practices among nutritionists and the adequacy of the current practices in the management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) patients at the Public Health Clinic in Padang (PHC), Indonesia. (2) Methods: An online survey form was distributed to all the nutritionists (n = 50) involved in the management of T2DM patients in their daily practices at the PHC. Socio-demographic characteristics, the current practice of T2DM, the need for DM nutrition education, and an evaluation questionnaire on the Indonesian Non-Communicable Diseases guideline and the Public Health Centre guideline were captured in the survey. (3) Result: A total of 48 completed survey forms were received, providing a response rate of 96% from the recruited nutritionists. One-third (37.5%) of the respondents counselled between one and ten patients per day. Nearly half (41.7%) conducted a monthly follow-up session for the patients at their respective PHC in the previous three months. Each nutritionist educated five to ten T2DM patients. The most common nutrition education topics delivered included appropriate menus (89.6%) as well as the etiology and symptoms of T2DM (85.5%). Almost all the nutritionists (93.8%) used leaflets and about 35.4% used poster education. Around 70.8% of counseling sessions lasted 30 min and two-thirds (66.7%) of the sessions included nutrition education. Based on the results, about half (52.1%) of them claimed that T2DM patients were reluctant to attend individual nutrition education. One-fifth of them (20.8%) claimed that it was because the T2DM patients were not interested in the tool kits and materials used. (4) Conclusions: T2DM patients are reluctant to attend individual nutrition education due to uninteresting tool kits and materials. Full article
Article
Primary Barriers of Adherence to a Structured Nutritional Intervention in Patients with Dyslipidemia
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1744; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13061744 - 21 May 2021
Viewed by 1356
Abstract
Purpose: To describe the primary barriers to adequately adhering to a structured nutritional intervention. Patients and methods: A total of 106 participants diagnosed with dyslipidemia and without a medical nutrition therapeutic plan were included in this two-year study conducted at the INCMNSZ dyslipidemia [...] Read more.
Purpose: To describe the primary barriers to adequately adhering to a structured nutritional intervention. Patients and methods: A total of 106 participants diagnosed with dyslipidemia and without a medical nutrition therapeutic plan were included in this two-year study conducted at the INCMNSZ dyslipidemia clinic in Mexico City. All patients were treated with the same structured strategies, including three face-to-face visits and two telephone follow-up visits. Diet plan adherence was evaluated at each site visit through a 3-day or 24-h food recall. Results: Barriers to adhere to the nutritional intervention were: lack of time to prepare their meals (23%), eating outside the home (19%), unwillingness to change dietary patterns (14%), and lack of information about a correct diet for dyslipidemias (14%). All barriers decreased significantly at the end of the intervention. Female gender, current smoking, and following a plan of more than 1500 kcal (R2 = 0.18 and p-value = 0.004) were associated with good diet adherence. Participants showed good levels of adherence to total caloric intake at visit 2 and 3, reporting 104.7% and 95.4%, respectively. Adherence to macronutrient intake varied from 65.1% to 126%, with difficulties in adhering to recommended carbohydrate and fat consumption being more notable. Conclusion: The study findings confirm that a structured nutritional intervention is effective in reducing barriers and improving dietary adherence and metabolic control in patients with dyslipidemias. Health providers must identify barriers to adherence early on to design interventions that reduce these barriers and improve adherence. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Development and Pilot Testing of a Food Literacy Curriculum for High School-Aged Adolescents
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1532; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13051532 - 01 May 2021
Viewed by 871
Abstract
Adolescent obesity and poor diet quality are increasingly prevalent and could be mitigated with attainment of food literacy. However, as these programs for adolescents are lacking, the purpose of this project was to develop a food literacy curriculum for high school-aged adolescents. The [...] Read more.
Adolescent obesity and poor diet quality are increasingly prevalent and could be mitigated with attainment of food literacy. However, as these programs for adolescents are lacking, the purpose of this project was to develop a food literacy curriculum for high school-aged adolescents. The curriculum was designed in accordance with food literacy attributes and components utilizing Backward Design, Social Cognitive Theory, and Constructivism. After expert committee review, pilot testing was completed in two low-income communities by a trained facilitator and observer. Detailed observations were collected during pilot testing to assess achievement of learning objectives. Modifications were made to lesson procedures as required. The resulting curriculum, Teens CAN: Comprehensive Food Literacy in Cooking, Agriculture, and Nutrition, contains 12 modules of experiential lessons and application activities within three topics. Agriculture lessons concentrate on the food supply chain and food environments; nutrition lessons include food groups while focusing on nutrients of concern for underconsumption; and cooking lessons include food safety, budgeting, and preparation. Teens CAN provides a comprehensive and necessary approach to advancing food literacy in adolescents. Future directions include assessing dietary implications after participating in Teens CAN lessons and employment of an innovative two-tiered cross-age teaching model. Full article
Article
Does Examining the Childhood Food Experiences Help to Better Understand Food Choices in Adulthood?
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 983; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13030983 - 18 Mar 2021
Viewed by 731
Abstract
Impact of parental feeding practices on children’s eating behaviors is well-documented in the literature. Nevertheless, little is known about how many of these behaviors might persist into adulthood. There is a lack of a tool measuring childhood feeding experiences recollected by adults, while [...] Read more.
Impact of parental feeding practices on children’s eating behaviors is well-documented in the literature. Nevertheless, little is known about how many of these behaviors might persist into adulthood. There is a lack of a tool measuring childhood feeding experiences recollected by adults, while the Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire (CFPQ) is used to measure parental feeding practices applied towards children. The aim of the study was to adapt the CFPQ to measure adults’ recollections of their childhood (5–10 years old) feeding experiences, to examine its discriminant validity and then to assess if these practices are related to adults’ food choices. In 2020, the modified version of CFPQ (mCFPQ) and questions on current food consumption were administered in a group of 500 adults twice over a two-week interval. The analysis included 443 participants whose questionnaires were correctly completed in both stages of the study. The Q-sorting procedure was used to test for discriminant validity of the questionnaire, i.e., confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis (EFA), Cronbach’s alpha, correlations coefficients, and the analysis of the differences between groups according to the intake of certain food products. Test–retest reliability was examined by calculating interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for each obtained factor. As a result of EFA, five subscales were identified: “Restrictions”, “Healthy Eating Guidance”, “Pressure and Food Reward”, “Monitoring”, and “Child Control”. Items from these subscales created a new tool—Adults’ Memories of Feeding in Childhood (AMoFiC). Test for internal consistency, factor correlations, and discriminant validity proved satisfactory psychometric parameters of AMoFiC. “Pressure and Food Reward” and “Child Control” were associated with higher intake of sweets and salty snacks, whereas “Healthy Eating Guidance”, “Monitoring”, and “Restrictions” were associated with higher consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables. Despite the fact that the AMoFiC questionnaire requires further research, the findings of the study might be of practical use in counseling addressed to the parents. Full article
Article
Healthy Lifestyle Management of Pediatric Obesity with a Hybrid System of Customized Mobile Technology: The PediaFit Pilot Project
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 631; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13020631 - 16 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1098
Abstract
Pediatric obesity management strategies suffer from a high rate of dropout and persistence of weight excess, despite the use of new tools, such as automated mobile technology (MT). We aimed to compare the efficacy of two 6-month personalized MT protocols in terms of [...] Read more.
Pediatric obesity management strategies suffer from a high rate of dropout and persistence of weight excess, despite the use of new tools, such as automated mobile technology (MT). We aimed to compare the efficacy of two 6-month personalized MT protocols in terms of better engagement, adherence to follow-up visits and improved anthropometric and lifestyle parameters. MT contacts consisted of three personalized/not automated What’s App® self-monitoring or challenge messages per week. Messages, sent by a dedicated coach were inserted between three-monthly in-presence regular visits with (PediaFit 1.2) or without (PediaFit 1.1) monthly free-of charge short recall visits carried out by a specialized pediatric team. The sample included 103 children (mean age 10 years, range 6–14) recruited in the Pediatric Obesity Clinic between January 2017 and February 2019, randomized into Intervention group (IG) (n = 24 PediaFit 1.1; n = 30 PediaFit 1.2) and Control group (CG) (total n = 49). Controls received standard treatment only (indications for healthy nutrition and physical activity, and three months in presence regular visits). Overall, both IGs achieved significantly better results than the CGs for all considered parameters. Comparison of the two IGs at the sixth month in particular showed an IG 1.2 statistically significantly lower drop-out rate (10% vs. 62%, p = 0.00009), along with significantly improved BMI (p = 0.003), Screen Time (p = 0.04) and fruit and vegetables consumption (p = 0.02). The study suggests that the hybrid association of messaging through personalized/not automated MT plus monthly free-of charge recall visits may improve the prefixed outcomes of MT weight loss intervention programs. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Physical Education and the Adoption of Habits Related to the Mediterranean Diet
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 567; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13020567 - 09 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 867
Abstract
Childhood obesity and sedentary lifestyles are now gaining a foothold in the Western world. The aim of this research was to analyse the influence of physical education classes on a healthy diet (i.e., Mediterranean diet). To this end, psychological constructs derived from the [...] Read more.
Childhood obesity and sedentary lifestyles are now gaining a foothold in the Western world. The aim of this research was to analyse the influence of physical education classes on a healthy diet (i.e., Mediterranean diet). To this end, psychological constructs derived from the theory of self-determination and the theory of planned behaviour were taken into account, such as the satisfaction and frustration of basic psychological needs, motivation in physical education classes, and social cognition and intention. A total of 3415 secondary school students (13–19 years) participated in this study. A structural equation model was proposed that would explain the relationships between the variables mentioned above and the adherence to a Mediterranean diet. The results provide adequate fit indexes for the proposed model. Based on the results of the study, it was concluded that a high satisfaction perceived in the physical education classes would help to reinforce the intention of having a healthy diet and therefore help to generate a perdurable commitment to this habit. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Effects of Three Different Family-Based Interventions in Overweight and Obese Children: The “4 Your Family” Randomized Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 341; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13020341 - 24 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1037
Abstract
Childhood overweight and obesity prevalence has risen dramatically in the past decades, and family-based interventions may be an effective method to improve children’s eating behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of three different family-based interventions: group-based, individual-based, or by website approach. [...] Read more.
Childhood overweight and obesity prevalence has risen dramatically in the past decades, and family-based interventions may be an effective method to improve children’s eating behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of three different family-based interventions: group-based, individual-based, or by website approach. Parents and school aged overweight or obese children, 8–12 years of age, were eligible for the study. A total of 115 children were randomly allocated in one of the three interventions, and 91 completed the study (79% compliance); Group 1 (n = 36) received group-based interventions by various experts; Group 2 (n = 30) had interpersonal family meetings with a dietitian; and Group 3 (n = 25) received training through a specifically developed website. Anthropometric, dietary, physical activity, and screen time outcomes were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Within-group comparisons indicated significant improvement in body weight, body mass index (BMI)-z-score, physical activity, and screen time from baseline in all three study groups (p < 0.05). Furthermore, total body fat percentage (%TBF) was also decreased in Groups 2 and 3. Between-group differences varied with body weight and %TBF change, being larger in Group 3 compared to Groups 1 and 2, in contrast to BMI-z-score, screen time, and health behaviors, which were significantly larger in Group 2 than the other two groups. In conclusion, personalized family-based interventions are recommended to successfully improve children’s lifestyle and body weight status. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Younger Adults Are More Likely to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Decrease Sugar Intake with the Application of Dietary Monitoring
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 333; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13020333 - 23 Jan 2021
Viewed by 811
Abstract
Establishing healthy eating habits is considered to be a sustainable strategy for health maintenance, and mobile applications (apps) are expected to be highly effective among the young-aged population for healthy eating promotion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of [...] Read more.
Establishing healthy eating habits is considered to be a sustainable strategy for health maintenance, and mobile applications (apps) are expected to be highly effective among the young-aged population for healthy eating promotion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a dietary monitoring app on younger adults’ nutrition knowledge and their dietary habits. A controlled-experimental study was performed with one experimental group having a three-hour nutrition seminar and 12 weeks of dietary monitoring with the app, and one control group receiving a three-hour nutrition seminar. Behavioral feedback delivered by the app was evaluated in facilitating the transfer of nutritional knowledge to nutrition behavior. A total of 305 younger adults aged from 19 to 31 were recruited. Baseline and post-intervention nutrition knowledge and dietary behavior were collected. All mean scores of post-GNKQ-R increased from baseline for both the control and the experimental groups. The mean differences of sugar intake, dietary fiber intake, and vitamin C intake for the experimental group were significantly more than those for the control group (all p < 0.001). In addition, the experimental group increased fruit and vegetable consumption significantly more than the control group (all p < 0.001). For those younger adults with a relatively large body size, they were more likely to increase fruit consumption with the application of dietary monitoring. Full article
Article
Association of Nutrition Education and Its Interaction with Lifestyle Factors on Kidney Function Parameters and Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Chronic Kidney Disease Patients in Taiwan
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 298; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13020298 - 21 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1023
Abstract
We evaluated the interactive effects of nutrition education (NE) and lifestyle factors on kidney function parameters and cardiovascular risk factors among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This cross-sectional cohort study recruited 2176 CKD stages 3–5 patients aged > 20 years from Integrated Chronic [...] Read more.
We evaluated the interactive effects of nutrition education (NE) and lifestyle factors on kidney function parameters and cardiovascular risk factors among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This cross-sectional cohort study recruited 2176 CKD stages 3–5 patients aged > 20 years from Integrated Chronic Kidney Disease Care Network, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taiwan between December 2008 and April 2019. The multivariable regression analysis was performed to investigate the interactive effects of NE with lifestyle factors on kidney function parameters and cardiovascular risk factors. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and attributable proportion (AP) were applied to assess additive interaction. Patients who were smoking or physically inactive but received NE had better estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (β: 3.83, 95% CI: 1.17–6.49 or β: 3.67, 95% CI: 2.04–5.29) compared to those without NE. Patients with smoking and NE significantly reduced risks for having high glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by 47%, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) by 38%, and high corrected calcium (C-Ca) by 50% compared to those without NE. Moreover, NE and smoking or inactive physical activity exhibited an excess risk of high C-Ca (RERI: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.09–0.85 for smoking or RERI: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.01–0.90 and AP: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.03–0.99 for physical activity). Our study suggests that CKD patients who were enrolled in the NE program had better kidney function. Thus, NE could be associated with slowing kidney function decline and improving cardiovascular risk factors. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Management Accounting for Healthy Nutrition Education: Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3715; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12123715 - 01 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1185
Abstract
Unequal economic growth shapes food systems. Nutrition problems incorporate inappropriate practices, so nutrition education is key to empowering consumers to choose healthy foods. However, increasing the accessibility of healthy diets is related to reducing the cost of nutritious foods. The accounting management of [...] Read more.
Unequal economic growth shapes food systems. Nutrition problems incorporate inappropriate practices, so nutrition education is key to empowering consumers to choose healthy foods. However, increasing the accessibility of healthy diets is related to reducing the cost of nutritious foods. The accounting management of healthy nutrition should allow for optimal global decision-making. The evolution of scientific production and global research trends on this topic between 1968 and 2019 have been studied. Statistical and mathematical methods have been applied to 1738 documents from the Scopus database. The results provided data on the agents that participate in the development of the theme. Data reveal an exponential trend, especially in the previous decade, with more than 50% of scientific production. Future lines of research have been identified: investment in health systems; green label education; early impact of food insecurity; WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) nutrition education; food waste audit; and ecological footprint of food. The central contribution of the study has been to detect the main future directions of research, providing critical points that will allow us to identify the themes of future publications, in addition to providing an instrument for decision-making carried out by the research funding sponsors. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Effects of Nutrition Education Interventions in Team Sport Players. A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3664; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12123664 - 28 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1549
Abstract
Considering nutrition education interventions have been frequently implemented in team sport athletes and have shown promising results, this study aimed to summarize the effects of nutrition education interventions on eating habits, nutrition knowledge, body composition, and physical performance in team sport athletes. A [...] Read more.
Considering nutrition education interventions have been frequently implemented in team sport athletes and have shown promising results, this study aimed to summarize the effects of nutrition education interventions on eating habits, nutrition knowledge, body composition, and physical performance in team sport athletes. A systematic review was conducted using the following databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science and SPORTDiscus. A total of 14 studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. The methodological quality of included studies was evaluated, and each study was assessed according to the analyzed variables (i.e., eating habits, nutrition knowledge, body composition, and physical performance). Most studies showed improvements in or maintenance of variables used to indicate eating habits, nutrition knowledge, and body composition. However, limited studies examined the effect of nutrition education interventions on physical performance, with existing studies demonstrating disparate results. These findings suggest implementation of nutrition education interventions in team sport athletes could be an effective strategy to improve their eating habits, nutrition knowledge, and body composition. Due to the heterogeneity across the included studies regarding sport modality, competition level, age, and sex of the athletes investigated, as well as the intervention type adopted (i.e., online or face-to-face), it is difficult to establish optimal nutrition education interventions for each analyzed variable. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop